• KOL
    • Antibiotic Resistance
    • Dan I Andersson
    • Dan I Andersson: Influence Statistics

      Dan I Andersson

      Dan I Andersson

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      Uppsala University, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala, Sweden | Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Sweden | ...

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      Dan I Andersson:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichDan I Anderssonhas direct influence:Antibiotic resistance,Salmonella typhimurium,Salmonella enterica,Escherichia coli,Resistant bacteria,Cob operon,Fitness cost,New genes.

      Dan I Andersson:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which Dan I Andersson has influence:Antibiotic resistance,Escherichia coli,Mycobacterium tuberculosis,Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Antimicrobial peptides,Fitness cost.

      KOL Resume for Dan I Andersson

      Year
      2022

      Uppsala University, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala, Sweden

      2021

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Sweden

      2020

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, SE-75124 Uppsala, Sweden

      2019

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

      2018

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Box 582, 751 23, Uppsala, Sweden

      2017

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3, SE-751 23, Uppsala, Sweden

      2016

      Uppsala University, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Box 582, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden

      2015

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, BOX 582S-75123, Uppsala, Sweden

      2014

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, BOX 582, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, SE-75123, Uppsala, Sweden

      2013

      Uppsala University Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology Uppsala Sweden

      2012

      Department of Medical Biochemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala S-751 23, Sweden

      2011

      Department of Infectious Diseases, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden

      2010

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology and

      2009

      Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Box 582, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden

      2008

      Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

      2007

      Dan I. Andersson is at the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, BOX 582, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.

      Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, S‐751 23, Uppsala, Sweden

      2006

      Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and Microbiology and Tumor Center, Karolinska Institute, S-171 82 Solna, Sweden

      2005

      Karolinska Institute and Swedish Institute for Infectious Diseases Control, Solna, Sweden

      +46-8-4572432; Fax: +46-8-301797; Email:

      2004

      Karolinska Institute, Microbiology and Tumour Biology Center, 171 77 Solna, Sweden

      Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control

      2003

      Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Dept. of Bacteriology, Nobels väg 18, S-171 82 Stockholm, Sweden

      Microbiology and Tumour Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, S-171 77 Stockholm

      2002

      Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, S 17182 Solna, Sweden

      2001

      Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, S‐171 82 Solna, Sweden

      2000

      1 Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Nobels väg 18, S‐171 82 Solna, Sweden. 
2 Microbiology and Tumour Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, S‐171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. 
3 Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, S‐751 24 Uppsala, Sweden. 
4 Center for Genomic Research, Karolinska Institute, 
S‐171 77 Stockholm, Sweden

      1999

      Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, S-17182 Solna, Sweden

      1998

      Uppsala universitet.

      Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

      1997

      Department of Microbiology, Uppsala University, Biomedical Centre, Box 581, S‐75123 Uppsala, Sweden.

      1996

      Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, S‐10521 Stockholm, Sweden

      1995

      Uppsala University, Department of Microbiology, BMC, Box 581, S‐75123 Uppsala, Sweden

      1994

      Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112.

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      Sample of concepts for which Dan I Andersson is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      amplification iles #1
      conditions antibiotic therapy #1
      specific antibiotic class #1
      drug collateral #1
      polii poliv #1
      farsc model #1
      cairnsian adaptive #1
      collaboration ema #1
      bacterial start inoculum #1
      genes amdinocillin resistance #1
      instability gene duplications #1
      low multidrug resistance #1
      general data gaps #1
      salmonella mouse environment #1
      dosedependent bloodstream #1
      vitro competitions #1
      assessment data gaps #1
      rearrangements bacterial genomes #1
      bacterial isolate subpopulations #1
      rates ascent #1
      growth limitation growth #1
      instability likelihood #1
      mutations hisa #1
      genomic buffering #1
      resistance cyclotides #1
      subpopulations bistable expression #1
      virulence typhimurium lt2 #1
      salmonella gidb mutations #1
      proposed amplification model #1
      defective catalase #1
      small growth improvements #1
      nitroxoline mic #1
      strong gene duplication #1
      data gaps levels #1
      absence antibiotic #1
      hostderived amps #1
      virulence growth rates #1
      drug sweeps #1
      recommended carry #1
      escherichia amdinocillin resistance #1
      growth adaptive mutation #1
      modern homologs #1
      s12 l14 #1
      confer antibiotic #1
      expression proteins pbp1b #1
      evolutionary questions dynamics #1
      prevented calculation #1
      fitnessreducing #1
      studied experimental systems #1
      uncertainties antimicrobial levels #1
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      Prominent publications by Dan I Andersson

      KOL-Index: 17740

      How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective ...

      Known for Heavy Metals | Resistance Plasmid | Sublethal Levels | Bacterial Escherichia | Low Antibiotic
      KOL-Index: 13719

      OBJECTIVES: To characterize the complete sequence, horizontal spread and stability of the CTX-M-15-encoding multiresistance plasmid of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain involved in a large nosocomial outbreak.

      METHODS: The 220 kbp plasmid pUUH239.2 was completely sequenced using 454 technology. The conjugational host range, conjugation frequencies, plasmid stability and fitness cost of plasmid carriage were studied in vitro. Conjugational spread during the outbreak was assessed ...

      Known for Klebsiella Pneumoniae | Escherichia Coli | Gene Transfer | Fitness Cost | Bacterial Electrophoresis
      KOL-Index: 11802

      Drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global problem, with major consequences for treatment and public health systems. As the emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis epidemics is largely influenced by the impact of the resistance mechanism on bacterial fitness, we wished to investigate whether compensatory evolution occurs in drug-resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. By combining information from molecular epidemiology studies of drug-resistant ...

      Known for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis | Aminoglycoside Resistance | 16s Rrna | Clinical Isolates | Bacterial Evolution
      KOL-Index: 11655

      Certain mutations in S12, a ribosomal protein involved in translation elongation rate and translation accuracy, confer resistance to the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Previously we showed in Salmonella typhimurium that the fitness cost, i.e. reduced growth rate, due to the amino acid substitution K42N in S12 could be compensated by at least 35 different mutations located in the ribosomal proteins S4, S5 and L19. Here, we have characterized in vivo the fitness, translation speed and ...

      Known for Ribosomal Protein L19 | Compensatory Evolution | Protein Synthesis | Fitness Cost | Resistance Mutation
      KOL-Index: 11654

      OBJECTIVES: The biological fitness cost of antibiotic resistance is a key parameter in determining the rate of appearance and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We identified mutations conferring nitrofurantoin resistance and examined their effect on the fitness of clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

      METHODS: By plating bacterial cells on agar plates containing nitrofurantoin, spontaneous nitrofurantoin-resistant E. coli mutants were isolated. The fitness of susceptible and ...

      Known for Nitrofurantoin Resistance | Escherichia Coli | Fitness Cost | Resistant Mutants | Growth Rate
      KOL-Index: 11240

      The pdu operon encodes proteins for the catabolism of 1,2-propanediol; the nearby cob operon encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis of adenosyl-cobalamin (vitamin B12), a cofactor required for the use of propanediol. These operons are transcribed divergently from distinct promoters separated by several kilobases. The regulation of the two operons is tightly integrated in that both require the positive activator protein PocR and both are subject to global control by the Crp and ArcA ...

      Known for Salmonella Typhimurium | Pdu Operon | Amino Acid | Bacterial Proteins | Reading Frames
      KOL-Index: 11209

      Fosfomycin has become an attractive treatment alternative for urinary tract infections (UTIs) due to increasing multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli In this study, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) indices of fosfomycin and its in vivo activity in an experimental murine model of ascending UTI. Subcutaneous administration of fosfomycin showed that the mean peak plasma concentrations of fosfomycin were 36, 280, and 750 mg/liter following ...

      Known for Escherichia Coli | Urinary Tract | Vivo Activity | Infection Model | Multidrug Resistance
      KOL-Index: 10992

      OBJECTIVES: To stepwise select tigecycline-resistant Escherichia coli mutants in vitro, determine the mutation rates, identify the resistance mechanisms, determine the resistance level and cross-resistance to other antibiotic classes, evaluate the fitness costs of tigecycline resistance mechanisms and investigate if the same in vitro-identified target genes were mutated in clinical isolates.

      METHODS: Spontaneous mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline were selected on agar ...

      Known for Tigecycline Resistance | Fitness Costs | Escherichia Coli | Clinical Isolates | Reduced Susceptibility
      KOL-Index: 10919

      Fosfomycin is a cell wall inhibitor used mainly for the treatment of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections. As shown here, resistance to fosfomycin develops rapidly in Escherichia coli under experimental conditions, but in spite of the relatively high mutation rate in vitro, resistance in clinical isolates is rare. To examine this apparent contradiction, we mathematically modeled the probability of resistance development in the bladder during treatment. The modeling showed that ...

      Known for Fosfomycin Resistance | Biological Costs | Bacterial Escherichia | Clinical Isolates | Resistant Strains
      KOL-Index: 10333

      Among the several factors that affect the appearance and spread of acquired antibiotic resistance, the mutation frequency and the biological cost of resistance are of special importance. Measurements of the mutation frequency to rifampicin resistance in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from dyspeptic patients showed that approximately 1/4 of the isolates had higher mutation frequencies than Enterobacteriaceae mismatch-repair defective mutants. This high mutation frequency could ...

      Known for Mutation Frequency | Biological Cost | Helicobacter Pylori | Antibiotic Resistance | Bacterial Proteins
      KOL-Index: 10002

      Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ...

      Known for Bacterial Resistance | Antimicrobial Peptides | Human Innate Immune | Conventional Antibiotics | Amps Clinical
      KOL-Index: 9862

      In a system described by Cairns and Foster, starvation of a particular leaky lac mutant (lacIZ33) in the presence of lactose appears to direct mutation in non-growing cells to sites that allow growth (adaptive mutation). This behaviour requires that the lac operon be located on an F' plasmid. This position effect was investigated by placing the mutant lac operon at many sites in the genome of Salmonella enterica (Typhimurium; LT2) and testing reversion behaviour. Genomic position did not ...

      Known for Adaptive Mutation | Genomic Position | Lac Frameshift | Selection Reversion | Salmonella Enterica
      KOL-Index: 9787

      Elucidating the adaptive strategies and plasticity of bacterial genomes in situ is crucial for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of pathogens threatening human health. While much is known about the evolution of Escherichia coli in controlled laboratory environments, less effort has been made to elucidate the genome dynamics of E. coli in its native settings. Here, we follow the genome dynamics of co-existing E. coli lineages in situ of the infant gut during the first year of ...

      Known for Escherichia Coli | Infant Gut | Antibiotic Treatment | Genetic Elements | Bacterial Genome
      KOL-Index: 9632

      Mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium resistant to fusidic acid (Fusr) have mutations in fusA, the gene encoding translation elongation factor G (EF-G). Most Fusr mutants have reduced fitness in vitro and in vivo, in part explained by mutant EF-G slowing the rate of protein synthesis and growth. However, some Fusr mutants with normal rates of protein synthesis still suffer from reduced fitness in vivo. As shown here, Fusr mutants could be similarly ranked in their relative ...

      Known for Salmonella Enterica | Fusidic Acid | Fusr Mutants | Serovar Typhimurium | Reduced Fitness Vivo
      KOL-Index: 9556

      Expression of the cob operon is repressed by B12 via a post-transcriptional control mechanism which requires sequence elements within the leader region of the mRNA and the first gene of the operon, the cbiA gene. Here we show that B12 repression of cbiA gene expression occurs at the level of translation initiation through sequestration of the ribosomal binding site (rbs) in an RNA hairpin. Analysis of mutations that destabilize or restabilize the secondary structure demonstrates that ...

      Known for Cob Operon | Translational Control | Vitamin B12 | Salmonella Typhimurium | Bacterial Rna

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      Uppsala University, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala, Sweden | Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Sweden | Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Upps

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