• KOL
    • Chlamydia Trachomatis
    • Walter E Stamm
    • Walter E Stamm: Influence Statistics

      Walter E Stamm

      Walter E Stamm

      Show email address

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. | Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. | Deceased. ...

      Is this your profile? manage_accounts Claim your profile content_copy Copy URL code Embed Link to your profile

      Walter E Stamm:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichWalter E Stammhas direct influence:Chlamydia trachomatis,Urinary tract,Urinary tract infection,Escherichia coli,Tract infections,Urinary tract infections,Antimicrobial resistance,Acute pyelonephritis.

      Walter E Stamm:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which Walter E Stamm has influence:Chlamydia trachomatis,Urinary tract,Escherichia coli,Clostridium difficile,Bacterial vaginosis,Asymptomatic bacteriuria,Antimicrobial resistance.

      KOL Resume for Walter E Stamm

      Year
      2014

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

      2013

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

      Deceased.

      2011

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington

      2010

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

      Professor of Medicine Emeritus, Owen R. Cheatham Professor of the Sciences Emeritus, Chief of Infectious Diseases Emeritus, University of Virginia Health Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

      2009

      Division of Allergy and Infectious Disease, the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

      Medicine and

      2008

      Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle

      2007

      Division of Allergy and Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195

      From the *University of Washington, Department of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; the †Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana; the ‡State University of New York, Department of Medicine, Brooklyn, New York; and the §ActivBiotics, Inc., Lexington, Massachusetts

      University of Washington, Seattle (Ms Roberts and Dr Stamm).

      2006

      Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195

      From the *Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; and the †Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington

      Centers for Disease Control, MS C17, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

      2005

      University of Washington, Seattle;

      Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, and

      2004

      1University of California, San Francisco, California 2University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 3University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 4University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 5Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California 6Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

      Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

      2003

      Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington

      2002

      Microbiology Laboratory, Kupat Holim, Tel-Hanan, Israel

      Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98195, USA.

      Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Box 356523, Seattle, WA, USA

      2001

      Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle;

      From University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

      University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle

      2000

      Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle

      1999

      Departments of Medicine and Pathobiology, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Department of Molecular Medicine, Northwest Hospital and Biomembrane Institute, Seattle, Washington

      1998

      University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, and

      1997

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center (WES), Seattle, Washington

      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!
      Sample of concepts for which Walter E Stamm is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      ompa polymorphism #1
      strains versus #1
      32fold 00078 chg #1
      7 trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole #1
      ruti young women #1
      aerobactin determinants strains #1
      trachomatis therapy #1
      uncomplicated cystitis isolation #1
      std bacterial #1
      resistance rates 20 #1
      catheter‐associated uti #1
      menses gonococcal coinfection #1
      immunity 32 #1
      sameserovar recurrences persistence #1
      transurethrally challenged mice #1
      laboratories 1998 #1
      nosocomial acquisition difficile #1
      crispatus recurrent uti #1
      fungal doxycycline #1
      week university cohort #1
      infection bacteriuria #1
      selective emergence resistance #1
      culture urethral #1
      2 lcr #1
      women cervical cap #1
      electron upec #1
      previous uti #1
      singledose rifalazil treatment #1
      1937 women #1
      facs dyes humans #1
      nonsecretor genotype #1
      50 ofloxacintreated patients #1
      drug gels chg #1
      healthy women cases #1
      specificity chlamydiazyme test #1
      bartonella quintana patients #1
      rectal flora women #1
      patientyear postcoital administration #1
      strains prostatitis #1
      infectionsjama relapsing infection #1
      chlamydia cultures #1
      homosexual management #1
      cases plan databases #1
      95 recurrent uti #1
      estriol nm #1
      d2a21 peptide mcc #1
      rifampin binding site #1
      ciprofloxacin vaginal colonization #1
      lcr yield #1
      uncomplicated cystitis tmpsmx #1
      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!

      Prominent publications by Walter E Stamm

      KOL-Index: 17312

      CONTEXT: Guidelines for the management of acute uncomplicated cystitis in women that recommend empirical therapy in properly selected patients rely on the predictability of the agents causing cystitis and knowledge of their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

      OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of and trends in antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens causing well-defined episodes of acute uncomplicated cystitis in a large population of women.

      DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of ...

      Known for Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis | Antimicrobial Resistance | Increasing Prevalence | Coli Isolates | Uropathogens Causing
      KOL-Index: 14872

      CONTEXT: The optimal antimicrobial regimen and treatment duration for acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis are unknown.

      OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of a 7-day ciprofloxacin regimen and a 14-day trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole regimen for the treatment of acute pyelonephritis in women.

      DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind comparative trial conducted from October 1994 through January 1997.

      SETTING: Twenty-five outpatient centers in the United States.

      PATIENTS: Of 378 enrolled ...

      Known for 7 Day | Uncomplicated Pyelonephritis | Trimethoprim Sulfamethoxazole | Patients Drug | 14 Women
      KOL-Index: 14186

      BACKGROUND: Many sex partners of persons with gonorrhea or chlamydial infections are not treated, which leads to frequent reinfections and further transmission.

      METHODS: We randomly assigned women and heterosexual men with gonorrhea or chlamydial infection to have their partners receive expedited treatment or standard referral. Patients in the expedited-treatment group were offered medication to give to their sex partners, or if they preferred, study staff members contacted partners and ...

      Known for Chlamydial Infection | Sex Partners | Patients Gonorrhea | Expedited Treatment | Standard Partner Referral
      KOL-Index: 13882

      OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and incidence of and risk factors for STD, including HIV-1, among a cohort of HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM).

      SETTING: Seattle, Washington, United States.

      PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort of 578 HIV-negative MSM in which risk factors for acquiring a STD over 12 months follow-up were evaluated using a cumulative incidence analysis.

      MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Baseline tests obtained were: herpes simplex ...

      Known for Sexually Transmitted Diseases | Hsv1 Hsv2 | Msm Male Humans | Incidence Hiv | Male Prevalence
      KOL-Index: 13535

      Women with a history of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections (UTIs) are two to three times more likely to be nonsecretors of histo-blood group antigens than are women without such a history. Further, uroepithelial cells from women who are nonsecretors show enhanced adherence of uropathogenic E. coli compared with cells from secretors. To investigate the hypothesis that nonsecretors express unique receptors for uropathogenic E. coli related to their genetic background, we ...

      Known for Uropathogenic Escherichia | Epithelial Cells | Nonsecretors Secretors | Sgg Dsgg | Urinary Tract Infections
      KOL-Index: 13144

      Few evaluations of tests for Chlamydia trachomatis have compared nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) with diagnostic tests other than those by culture. In a five-city study of 3,551 women, we compared the results of commercial ligase chain reaction (LCR) and PCR tests performed on cervical swabs and urine with the results of PACE 2 tests performed on cervical swabs, using independent reference standards that included both cervical swabs and urethral swab-urine specimens. Using ...

      Known for Cervical Swabs | Amplification Tests | Chlamydia Trachomatis | Nucleic Acid | Dna Probe
      KOL-Index: 13056

      To define the urovirulence properties of Escherichia coli strains producing prostatitis, E. coli strains isolated from men with acute (7 strains) or chronic (23) prostatitis were compared with E. coli isolates from women with pyelonephritis (30), acute cystitis (60), or complicated urinary tract infection (UTI; 30). Strains from prostatitis patients were significantly more likely to express hemolysin than were strains causing complicated UTI (73% vs. 43%; P = .02) and more often ...

      Known for Coli Strains | Escherichia Infections Escherichia | Causing Prostatitis | Proteins Female Fimbriae | Urinary Tract
      KOL-Index: 12880

      BACKGROUND: High rates of resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) among uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recognized, and concerns exist about emerging fluoroquinolone resistance.

      METHODS: Adults presenting to 11 US emergency departments with (1) flank pain and/or costovertebral tenderness, (2) temperature >38 degrees C, and (3) a presumptive diagnosis of pyelonephritis were enrolled; patients for whom 1 uropathogen grew on culture were analyzed. Epidemiologic and clinical ...

      Known for Escherichia Coli | Uncomplicated Pyelonephritis | Resistance Ciprofloxacin | Tmp Smx | Infection Patients
      KOL-Index: 12781

      To assess the role of aerobactin as a virulence factor among uropathogenic Escherichia coli, we determined the prevalence, location, and phenotypic expression of aerobactin determinants among 58 E. coli strains causing bacteremic urinary tract infections. We correlated the presence of the aerobactin system with antimicrobial-agent resistance, the presence and phenotypic expression of other uropathogenic virulence factor determinants (P fimbriae, hemolysin, and type 1 fimbriae), and ...

      Known for Virulence Factor | Bacterial Genes | Microbial Escherichia | Aerobactin Determinants | Strains Patients
      KOL-Index: 12069

      PURPOSE: Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 is a vaginal probiotic proposed for use in women with recurrent urinary tract infection to reduce vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli and the risk of urinary tract infection. However, the ability of this probiotic strain to adhere to the target mucosa, vaginal epithelial cells, has not been assessed in women with recurrent urinary tract infection. We measured the adherence of L. crispatus strain CTV-05 to vaginal epithelial cells ...

      Known for Vaginal Epithelial Cells | Urinary Tract | Lactobacillus Crispatus | Women Recurrent | Sexual Activity
      KOL-Index: 11804

      BACKGROUND: Since the early 1980s, the Bahamas has experienced sequential epidemics of freebase/crack cocaine use, genital ulcer-inguinal adenopathy disease (GUD), and heterosexual HIV infection.

      GOAL: To prospectively define the etiology of GUD in patients at the Princess Margaret Hospital during outbreaks of crack cocaine use, GUD, and HIV infection in the Bahamas.

      STUDY DESIGN: In Nassau, 47 consecutive patients with GUD underwent serologic testing for syphilis and for infections with ...

      Known for Hiv Infection | Crack Cocaine | Lymphogranuloma Venereum | Gud Bahamas | Pcr Trachomatis
      KOL-Index: 11607

      BACKGROUND: Bartonella (Rochalimaea) quintana is a fastidious gram-negative bacterium known to cause trench fever, cutaneous bacillary angiomatosis, and endocarditis. Between January and June 1993 in Seattle, we isolated B. quintana from 34 blood cultures obtained from 10 patients not known to be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

      METHODS: After identifying the isolates as B. quintana by direct immunofluorescence and DNA-hybridization studies, we determined strain ...

      Known for Quintana Bacteremia | Blood Cultures | Trench Fever | 10 Patients | Bartonella Rochalimaea

      Key People For Chlamydia Trachomatis

      Top KOLs in the world
      #1
      Julius S Schachter
      chlamydia trachomatis neisseria gonorrhoeae pelvic inflammatory disease
      #2
      Walter E Stamm
      chlamydia trachomatis urinary tract escherichia coli
      #3
      King Kennard Holmes
      chlamydia trachomatis united states bacterial vaginosis
      #4
      Robert Conrad Brunham
      chlamydia trachomatis protective immunity dendritic cells
      #5
      Harlan D Caldwell
      chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane genital tract
      #6
      Thomas C Quinn
      chlamydia trachomatis hiv infection viral load

      Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. | Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. | Deceased. | Department of Medicine, University of Washington | Department of Medicine

    Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

    Copyright © 2023 Key Opinion Leaders, LLC.