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    • Hip Fracture
    • J Richard Hebel
    • J Richard Hebel: Influence Statistics

      J Richard Hebel

      J Richard Hebel

      University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA | Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University ...

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      J Richard Hebel:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichJ Richard Hebelhas direct influence:Hip fracture,Chronic pyelonephritis,Nursing homes,Cerebral infarction,Interstitial cystitis,Body composition,Hip fracture patients,Nursing residents.

      J Richard Hebel:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which J Richard Hebel has influence:Hip fracture,Nursing homes,Urinary tract,Cognitive impairment,Escherichia coli,Older people,Ischemic stroke.

      KOL Resume for J Richard Hebel

      Year
      2018

      University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA

      2016

      University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

      2015

      Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

      2013

      University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore Maryland

      2012

      Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

      2011

      Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (Drs Orwig, Hochberg, Yu-Yahiro, Resnick, Hawkes, Shardell, Hebel, Miller, and Magaziner and Ms Golden)

      2010

      Division of Gerontology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

      2009

      From the Department of Health Policy Management and Behavior, State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany, School of Public Health, Rensselaer, New York (YY); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (M-YF); the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (JRH); the Department of Health Policy and Management, Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland (CB).

      University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA

      2008

      1University of Maryland

      2007

      University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA

      2006

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

      2005

      From the *Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine†Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland‡Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and the School of Social Work, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina§Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland∥Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Long‐Term Care, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC

      Department of Epidemioiogy and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School o f Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

      2004

      Division of Gerontology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

      From the *Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland†Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania‡School of Social Work and Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

      2003

      Cynthia L. Port, PhD, is Academic Fellow, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. J. Richard Hebel, PhD, is Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Ann L. Gruber-Baldini, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Mona Baumgarten, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore. Lynda Burton, PhD, is Associate Research Professor, School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Sheryl Zimmerman, PhD, is Associate Professor, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and the School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jay Magaziner, PhD, is Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore.

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

      University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore

      2002

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland;

      From the University of Texas Health Science Center (R.L.B., C.L.S., D.L.M.), San Antonio, Tex; the University of Maryland at Baltimore (M.A.W., T.R.P., J.R.H., S.J.K.), The Johns Hopkins University (R.J.W., C.J.E., D.W.B.), Baltimore, Md; Emory University (B.J.S.), Atlanta, Ga; Rush Neuroscience Institute (M.A.S.), Chicago, Ill; Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (R.S.), New Orleans, La; Baltimore VA Medical Center (R.F.M.), Baltimore, Md; and Neurological Medicine (C.J...

      The University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA

      Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

      2001

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

      2000

      Mental Health Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, MD and the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

      Division of Gerontology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore

      1999

      Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Program of Comparative Medicine, Departments of Pathology and Epidemiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Baltimore, Maryland, and Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington

      Division of Gerontology and Epidemiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

      University of Maryland School of Medicine,2 and

      1998

      Department of Epidemiology,5 University of Maryland School of Medicine, and

      1997

      Department of Epidemiology, University of Maryland Medical Center U.S.A.

      1996

      Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Nephrology, Department of Medicine, the Department of Pathology, and the Division of Urology, Department of Surgery and the Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland.

      From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

      1995

      From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, and Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

      1991

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

      1990

      Address correspondence and reprint requests to J. Richard Hebel, PhD, Department of Epidemiology, Room 146-J, Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine

      1989

      Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

      1988

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

      1987

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 21201, Baltimore, Maryland

      1986

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 USA

      1984

      From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201.

      1983

      Department of Anatomy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 USA

      1981

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201, U.S.A.

      1980

      Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore St, Baltimore, MD 21201, U.S.A.

      1977

      Department of General Surgery, Roswell Park Memorial Institute, New York State Department of Health, Buffalo, New York

      1974

      Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, School of MedicineBaltimore, Maryland 21201, U.S.A

      1970

      Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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      Sample of concepts for which J Richard Hebel is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      reported eye irritation #1
      exposures aca #1
      statistical model diagnosis #1
      medical service residents #1
      biochemical measure ment #1
      doseresponse birth weight #1
      upec factors #1
      2049 transposon mutants #1
      numerous bacterial factors #1
      bacterial cystitis urine #1
      multiple trauma sensitivity #1
      admission residents #1
      registration prenatal #1
      screening hypertensives #1
      3hthymidine incorporation urine #1
      current psuds #1
      berman colleagues #1
      aca exposure function #1
      violence 246 #1
      visits treatment sites #1
      thiocyanate simple method #1
      dental roll thiocyanate #1
      700 pregnant smokers #1
      test eighth month #1
      points 1 thiocyanate #1
      reports prepregnancy #1
      advance directives veterans #1
      nonsmokers pregnancy #1
      hcho respirable particles #1
      living 342 #1
      maryland nursing #1
      1118 adult inpatients #1
      current alcoholics 144 #1
      dose birth weight #1
      reply berman #1
      so2 response enhancement #1
      85 174 #1
      patients vehicular crashes #1
      conditional probability individual #1
      smoking status randomization #1
      severity hopelessness #1
      illness chronic pyelonephritis #1
      bladder disease women #1
      487 residents #1
      lung male sulfur #1
      uti animal #1
      innercity black population #1
      44 durable #1
      random sample hypertension #1
      patients alcohol dependent #1
      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!

      Prominent publications by J Richard Hebel

      KOL-Index: 15411

      OBJECTIVES: To compare rates of falling between nursing home residents with and without dementia and to examine dementia as an independent risk factor for falls and fall injuries.

      DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 2 years of follow-up.

      SETTING: Fifty-nine randomly selected nursing homes in Maryland, stratified by geographic region and facility size.

      PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand fifteen newly admitted residents aged 65 and older.

      MEASUREMENTS: During 2 years after nursing home ...

      Known for Fall Injuries | Residents Dementia | 2 Years | Independent Risk Factor | Homes Aged
      KOL-Index: 14921

      PURPOSE: Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder disease for which the etiology is unknown. Because the bladder epithelium is often abnormal in IC, we determined whether the levels of specific urine growth factors postulated to be important for bladder epithelial proliferation are altered in IC.

      MATERIALS AND METHODS: ELISAs were used to determine levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), ...

      Known for Growth Factor | Cystitis Patients | Asymptomatic Controls | Egf Urine | Female Heparin
      KOL-Index: 14673

      Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men.IntroductionEach year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in ...

      Known for Hip Fracture | Bone Mineral Density | Femoral Neck | Bmd Women | Sex Characteristics
      KOL-Index: 13182

      OBJECTIVES: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common diagnosis, but the disease is poorly understood. The diagnosis is based only on symptoms, and no measurable parameter can help in defining the presence of the disease, its severity, or its cause. Cytokines are soluble proteins secreted by cells of the immune system that principally regulate inflammatory and immune responses. To provide an objective measure of inflammation in the genital tract, we measured levels of ...

      Known for Pain Syndrome | Proinflammatory Cytokines | Chronic Prostatitis | Elevated Levels | Semen Patients
      KOL-Index: 12816

      OBJECTIVES: Determine the relationship between a broad array of structure and process elements of nursing home care and (a) resident infection and (b) hospitalization for infection.

      DESIGN: Baseline data were collected from September 1992 through March 1995, and residents were followed for 2 years; facility data were collected at the midpoint of follow-up.

      SETTING: A stratified random sample of 59 nursing homes across Maryland.

      PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand fifteen new admissions aged 65 ...

      Known for Registered Nurse | Turnover Infection | Chain Affiliation | Rates Hospitalization | Staff Satisfaction
      KOL-Index: 12250

      OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to describe changes in the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication prescribing before and after nursing home admission, and to compare prevalence among residents with and without dementia. This paper extends the research on inappropriate medication prescribing among residents entering a nursing home, with the added feature of comparison by dementia status.

      METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from 59 randomly ...

      Known for Inappropriate Prescribing | Nursing Admission | Prevalence Residents | Patients Dementia | 65 Years
      KOL-Index: 12085

      Possible explanations for the observed gender difference in mortality after hip fracture were examined in a cohort of 804 men and women. Mortality during 2 years after fracture was identified from death certificates. Men were twice as likely as women to die, and deaths caused by pneumonia/influenza and septicemia showed the greatest increase.

      INTRODUCTION: Men are more likely to die after hip fracture than women. Gender differences in predisposing factors and causes of death have not ...

      Known for Hip Fracture | Gender Differences | 2 Years | 1 Year | Death Certificates
      KOL-Index: 12070

      Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Despite the association of numerous bacterial factors with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), few such factors have been proved to be required for UTI in animal models. Previous investigations of urovirulence factors have relied on prior identification of phenotypic characteristics. We used signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) in an unbiased effort to identify genes that are essential for UPEC survival within the murine ...

      Known for Type 1 Fimbriae | Murine Urinary Tract | Virulence Determinants | Extracellular Polysaccharides | Escherichia Coli
      KOL-Index: 11773

      There is conflicting evidence regarding a possible causal role for Chlamydia trachomatis in the development of preterm premature rupture of the membranes. We investigated the relative prevalence of endocervical infection with C. trachomatis and group B streptococci in patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes compared with a control group taken from the same obstetric population. C. trachomatis was isolated from 23/52 (44%) patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes ...

      Known for Chlamydia Trachomatis | Neisseria Gonorrhoeae | Preterm Rupture | Pregnancy Outcome | Infections Streptococcus
      KOL-Index: 11635

      OBJECTIVE: As part of a larger study to describe indices of recovery during the year after hip fracture, the current prospective study investigated longitudinal changes in serum and urine markers of bone metabolism for the year after hip fracture and related them to bone mineral density (BMD).

      DESIGN: A representative subset of participants provided serum and urine samples and had bone density measured at 3, 10, 60, 180, and 365 days postfracture.

      SETTING: Two Baltimore ...

      Known for Hip Fracture | Bone Metabolism | Photon Aged Aged | Urine Samples | Parathyroid Hormone
      KOL-Index: 11484

      BACKGROUND: Hip fracture patients are at increased risk of confusion or delirium due to the trauma associated with the injury and the rapid progression to hospitalization and surgery, in addition to the pain and loss of function experienced. Hip fracture patients who develop delirium may require longer hospital stays, are more often discharged to long-term care, and have a generally poor prognosis for returning home or regaining function in activities of daily living (ADL).

      METHODS: The ...

      Known for Hospital Admission | Hip Fracture Patients | Functional Outcomes | Function Risk Factors | Pain Patient
      KOL-Index: 11364

      IntroductionHip fracture is a major public health problem, annually affecting over 350,000 persons in the United States and 1.6 million worldwide. Consequences include decreased survival, loss of independence, and increased risk of subsequent fractures. A substantial decline in bone mineral density (BMD) also occurs, yet the magnitude of the decline specifically attributable to hip fracture has not been documented.MethodsTo determine the amount of BMD decline attributable to hip ...

      Known for Hip Fracture | Bone Mineral Density | United States | Femoral Neck | Decline Bmd
      KOL-Index: 11320

      CONTEXT: Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a strong risk factor for fracture in community-dwelling white women, but the relationship in white female nursing home residents, for whom fracture rates are highest, is less clear.

      OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative contribution of low BMD to fracture risk in nursing home residents.

      DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with baseline data collected April 1995 to June 1997, with 18 months of follow-up.

      SETTING: Forty-seven randomly selected nursing ...

      Known for Fracture Risk | Low Bone | Nursing Residents | Mineral Density | Homes Aged
      KOL-Index: 10999

      Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTI) in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities or with long-term catheterization, forms bladder and kidney stones as a consequence of urease-mediated urea hydrolysis. Known virulence factors, besides urease, are hemolysin, fimbriae, metalloproteases, and flagella. In this study we utilized the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI to evaluate the colonization of mutants of P. mirabilis HI4320 that were generated ...

      Known for Proteus Mirabilis | Urinary Tract | Bacterial Humans | Cba Mouse Model | Virulence Factors
      KOL-Index: 10966

      Abstract: Few studies of bone loss have assessed the amount of loss directly after a hip fracture. The present prospective study was conducted to determine changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass shortly after fracture and through 1 year to assess short-term loss and related factors. The setting was two acute care teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland, and subjects were 205 community-dwelling women with a new fracture of the proximal femur between 1992 and 1995. Bone ...

      Known for Bone Density | Hip Fracture | Photon Aged Aged | 1 Year | Lean Body

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      University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA | Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. | Department of Epidemiology

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