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    • Gertrude E Henle
    • Gertrude E Henle: Influence Statistics

      Gertrude E Henle

      Gertrude E Henle

      The J. Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA | The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute at the Children's Hospital of ...

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      Gertrude E Henle:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichGertrude E Henlehas direct influence:Infectious mononucleosis,Nasopharyngeal carcinoma,Barr virus,Viral antigens,Epsteinbarr virus,Burkitt lymphoma,Early antigens,Epstein‐barr virus.

      Gertrude E Henle:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which Gertrude E Henle has influence:Barr virus,Nasopharyngeal carcinoma,Infectious mononucleosis,Cell lines,Ebv infection,4 human,Burkitt lymphoma.

      KOL Resume for Gertrude E Henle

      Year
      1989

      The J. Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

      1988

      Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital, Hennepin County Medical Center and the Minneapolis Blood Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and the Joseph Stokes, Jr. Research Institute, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      1987

      Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA

      The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 191014, U.S.A.

      1986

      The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

      From the Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai and Abbott-Northwestern Hospitals and University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneaplolis, Minnesota; and the Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute of the Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

      1985

      From the Ear, Nose and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; Julianehdb Sygehus, Dronning Ingrids Sygehus, Godthab, Angmagsalik Sygehus, and Holsteinsborg Sygehus, Greenland; the Joseph Stokes JR Research Institute, the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, USA, the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Copenhagen, and the Institute of Pathological Anatomy, Gentofte Sygehus, Copenhagen, Denmark

      1984

      Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 USA

      The Joseph Stokes, Jr., Research Institute, The Children Hospital of Philadelphra, 19104, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      1983

      Division of Virology, Joseph Stokes, Jr., Research Institute of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. USA

      The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      From the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

      1982

      The Joseph Stokes, Jr., Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 USA

      1981

      The Joseph Stokes, Jr., Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, PA. 19104

      1980

      Divisions of Virology, Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104

      The Joseph Stokes, Jr., Research Institute. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      Philadelphia, PA.

      1979

      School of Medicine, University ofPennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA USA

      1978

      Division of Virology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., USA

      The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Blvd., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, (U.S.A.)

      1977

      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

      Department of Pathology, Columbus Children's Hospital and Ohio State University Medical School, Columbus, Ohio

      1976

      Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa., USA

      1975

      Division of Virology, Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

      1974

      The Virus Laboratories at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

      Department of Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institutet and Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden

      Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia

      1973

      The Virus Laboratories at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

      1972

      Division of Virology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

      Department of Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

      The Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

      1971

      Department of Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institute Medical School, Stockholm, Sweden

      Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 1740 Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia 19146, Pa., USA

      1970

      Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19146

      School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pa., USA

      Institute for Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm 60, Sweden

      Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya

      1969

      From the Department of Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institute Medical School, Stockholm 60, Sweden; The Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19146; and the Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya

      Virus and Cytogenetics Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 19146, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      1968

      From the Department of Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institute Medical School, Stockholm 60, Sweden; The Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19146; and the Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya

      Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and The School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19146

      1967

      Virus Laboratories, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19146

      1966

      The Virus Laboratories, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.

      1965

      From the Bland-Sutton Institute of Pathology, The Middlesex Hospital Medical School, London, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

      1961

      Virus Diagnostic Laboratory, Reference Laboratory of the Department of Health, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. USA

      1959

      Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania USA

      1958

      The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

      1955

      From the Division of Virology, the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia

      1952

      The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the Division of Virology, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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      Sample of concepts for which Gertrude E Henle is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      complementary sera #1
      mononucleosislike syndrome cytomegalovirus #1
      mononucleosis syndrome #1
      davidsohn antigen #1
      intern epsteinbarr #1
      viral antigens heterophil #1
      cell hemolysis assay #1
      physicians marked hyperbilirubinemia #1
      paulbunnelldavidsohn bunnelldavidsohn #1
      antibody titers methods #1
      differential absorption test #1
      paul bunnelldavidsohn type #1
      epsteinbarr viral aspartate #1
      encountered infectious #1
      threestage acif technique #1
      lymphoma lymphoblasts #1
      dead degenerating cells #1
      intense hyperbilirubinemia #1
      hyperbilirubinemia infectious #1
      mononucleosis animals #1
      antiebv titers #1
      prozone reactions #1
      heterophil antigen #1
      diagnosis cmvim syndrome #1
      bunnell davidsohn #1
      mononucleosis leukocytes #1
      burkitts lymphoma lymphoblasts #1
      intact altered cells #1
      larger mature particles #1
      sera detectable #1
      nonanticomplementary sera #1
      comparable antiebna titers #1
      complications laboratory data #1
      epsteinbarr complications #1
      infectious mononucleosis hematologic #1
      virus‐associated nuclear #1
      analysis laboratory data #1
      target cell smears #1
      lymphoblasts eb1 #1
      stage acif #1
      ebv clinical jaundice #1
      anticomplementary human sera #1
      heterophil bunnelldavidsohn #1
      laboratory data combination #1
      complications intern #1
      cmvigm test #1
      cmvim syndrome basis #1
      paulbunnelldavidsohn antigen concentrations #1
      twostage acif test #1
      immunoglobulin mononucleosis #1
      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!

      Prominent publications by Gertrude E Henle

      KOL-Index: 14635

      The frequencies and levels of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antigens were determined in paired sera and synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in sera from patients with other connective tissue diseases; i.e., systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, and osteoarthritis (OA). The specimens were also tested for the presence of antibodies to RA-associated nuclear antigen. Compared to healthy controls, the patients' sera showed ...

      Known for Synovial Fluids | Rheumatoid Arthritis | Elevated Levels | Viral Antigens | Barr Virus
      KOL-Index: 13760

      Stimulated by a report on elevated IgA levels in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), we tested a total of 372 sera from patients with NPC, other carcinomas of head and neck or elsewhere, Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), infectious mononucleosis (IM) or healthy controls. The sera were titrated in indirect immunofluorescence tests for IgA antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsid antigen (VCA) and to the diffuse (D) or restricted (R) components of the EBV-induced early antigen (EA) complex. The ...

      Known for Specific Iga | Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma | Patients Npc | Infectious Mononucleosis | Barr Virus
      KOL-Index: 12163

      Continuous human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LL), derived from lymphoid tissue or peripheral blood of 20 adults without histories of recent infectious mononucleosis at a frequency close to 100 %, were examined for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using immunofluorescence methods for the detection of EBV-dependent cell membrane and EB viral capsid antigens. All lines except one were found to be EBV carriers in the initial tests, but the antigens gradually disappeared in most during ...

      Known for Lymphoblastoid Lines | Human Lymphoid | Ebv Establishment | Infectious Mononucleosis | Peripheral Blood
      KOL-Index: 10765

      Inoculation of the MCN and Lung-To lines of human cells in continuous culture with Newcastle disease (NDV), mumps, or 6-6 viruses led to slight cytopathic effects (CPE) if the multiplicity of infection exceeded one. On second passage or with smaller initial inocula no CPE became apparent. The viruses multiplied, however, as determined by titrations in HeLa cultures or chick embryos. Indeed, persistently infected sublines of MCN and Lung-To were readily established without resort to ...

      Known for Persistent Infections | Tissue Cultures | Resistance Vsv | Viruses Cells | Newcastle Disease
      KOL-Index: 10281

      Henle, Gertrude (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa.), and Werner Henle. Immunofluorescence in cells derived from Burkitt's lymphoma. J. Bacteriol. 91:1248-1256. 1966.-Indirect immunofluorescence tests led to the brilliant staining of a small proportion of the cells in five different cultures derived from Burkitt's (African) lymphomas. The reaction was not restricted to the 17 sera from cases of this disease but extended to many sera from American individuals, whether ...

      Known for Cells Derived | Lymphoid Leukemia | Immune Sera | Burkitts Lymphoma | Human Horses Humans
      KOL-Index: 10032

      Continuous lymphoblastoid cell cultures were established from marmoset (Saguinus sp.), squirrel (Saimiri sciureus), owl (Aotus trivirgatus) and cebus (Cebus apella) monkeys after culturing their peripheral lymphocytes with lethally X-irradiated cells carrying Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Transformation also was achieved by exposing simian lymphocytes to infectious, cell-free EBV derived from the simian lymphoblastoid cell cultures. Simian lymphocytes were not transformed after exposure to ...

      Known for Epstein‐barr Virus | Cell Cultures | Saimiri Sciureus | Antigens Viral | Antibodies Ebv
      KOL-Index: 9740

      Previous reports (1, 2) have established that the expression of certain distinctive membrane antigen(s) on the surface of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and infectious mononucleosis (IM) cells is dependent on the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the cell line. The investigations reported here provide evidence that antibodies directed against EBV antigens, as revealed by the immunofluorescence test on acetone-fixed smears (8), and the membrane reactive antibodies, although often present ...

      Known for Cell Membrane | Patients Sera | Ebv Antibody | Burkitt Tumor | Previous Reports
      KOL-Index: 9674

      Sera from Swedish patients with Hodgkin's disease as well as control sera from donors without known disease were titrated for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. In the same sera antibodies capable of blocking the direct membrane immunofluorescence reaction obtained between Epstein-Barr virus carrying lymphoblastoid cell lines and a fluorescein-conjugated reference serum from a patient with Burkitt's lymphoma (F-Mutua conjugate) were ...

      Known for Barr Virus | Malignant Lymphoma | Hodgkins Disease | Control Sera | Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
      KOL-Index: 9442

      Sera from patients with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), infectious mononucleosis (IM), carcinoma of the postnasal space (Ca PNS), and various controls were investigated for antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by immunofluorescence on acetone-fixed smears (5) and for antibodies against the distinctive antigenic sites expressed on the surface of viable lymphoblastoid cells within EBV-carrying culture lines (1). The latter were studied by the blocking of direct membrane staining with ...

      Known for Cell Membrane | Sera Patients | Infectious Mononucleosis | Burkitt Lymphoma | Postnasal Space
      KOL-Index: 8917

      In previous reports of this series, it was shown that persistent infection of MCN cultures with certain myxoviruses rendered the cells insusceptible to superinfection by several cytopathogenic viruses. It was thought that production of an interferon might be the cause of this resistance and efforts to confirm this suggestion have been presented. Addition of ultraviolet-inactivated myxoviruses (mumps, Newcastle disease, influenza A, and Sendai) to MCN cultures for periods of 2 to 3 hours, ...

      Known for Persistent Infection | Tissue Cultures | Hela Cells | Newcastle Disease | Mumps Virus
      KOL-Index: 8816

      Inoculation of 64-10 or Raji cultures with Epstein-Barr virus derived from the HRI-K clone of the P3J Burkitt's lymphoma line caused abortive infections in most of the lymphoblastoid cells with synthesis of "early antigens" but few, if any, capsids. Antibodies to early antigens were detected by indirect immunofluorescence in serums of many patients with infectious mononucleosis, Burkitt's lymphoma, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. These antibodies were rarely present in other serums even ...

      Known for Early Antigens | Barr Virus | Infectious Mononucleosis Antibodies | Burkitt Lymphoma | Lymphoblastoid Cells
      KOL-Index: 8757

      A search was made for Epstein-BARR virus (EBV) associated nuclear antigen (EBNA) in touch preparations of fresh biopsy material from 26 carcinomas of the nasopharynx, 39 other tumours of the head and neck, the nasopharyngeal mucosa of 32 patients in whom nasopharyngeal neoplasm had been excluded, and the mucosa from enlarged but non-neoplastic tonsils removed from 12 patients. EBNA-positive cells were uniformly detected in the preparations from the undifferentiated and poorly ...

      Known for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma | Ebv Serology | Head Neck | Presence Ebna | Squamous Cell
      KOL-Index: 8724

      From 1978 to 1981, 151 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were enrolled in a prospective, collaborative study of North American patients, most of them white. Thirty-seven had World Health Organization (WHO) type 1 tumors, and 114 had WHO types 2 and 3 tumors. The anti-Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) profile of elevated antibody titers directed against viral capsid antigen and early antigen was seen in 85% of the patients with WHO types 2 and 3 tumors but in only 16% of the patients ...

      Known for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma | North Patients | Barr Virus | 1 Tumors | Antibody Titers
      KOL-Index: 8721

      A rapid, sensitive indirect immunofluorescence assay has been developed for detection of antibodies to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated retrovirus (ARV). The human T-cell line HUT-78 was chronically infected with ARV-2 and used to detect antibodies to virus-specific cytoplasmic antigens. Because the helper T-cell marker Leu-3 is substantially reduced in this cell line after ARV infection, it appears to be an important receptor for virus infection. Nearly all ...

      Known for Antibodies Arv | Acquired Immune | Deficiency Syndrome | Aidsassociated Retrovirus | Virus Infection

      Key People For Infectious Mononucleosis

      Top KOLs in the world
      #1
      Werner Henle
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      #2
      Gertrude E Henle
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      #3
      George Klein
      barr virus cell lines burkitt lymphoma
      #4
      James C Niederman
      infectious mononucleosis barr virus viral antigens
      #5
      Alfred S Evans
      infectious mononucleosis barr virus infection disease
      #6
      Alan B Rickinson
      barr virus cell lines burkitt lymphoma

      The J. Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA | The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA | Departments of Laboratory Med

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