Jie Chen: Influence Statistics

Jie Chen

Jie Chen

Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign, IL, USA | Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at ...

Jie Chen: Expert Impact

Concepts for which Jie Chen has direct influence: Mammalian target , Skeletal myogenesis , Skeletal muscle , Skeletal muscle regeneration , Periodontal ligament , Muscle regeneration , Canine retraction .

Jie Chen: KOL impact

Concepts related to the work of other authors for which for which Jie Chen has influence: Skeletal muscle , Mammalian target , Phosphatidic acid , Insulin resistance , Protein synthesis , Cell growth , Signal transduction .

KOL Resume for Jie Chen

Year
2022

Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign, IL, USA

2021

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address:

2020

Department of Cell Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 S. Goodwin Ave. B107, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA

2019

Department of Orthodontics and Oral Facial Genetics, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Ind

2018

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indianapoli, United States.

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

2017

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois; and.

2016

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA

2015

Professor and chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, Ind; professor, Department of Orthodontics and Oral Facial Genetics, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Ind

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

2014

Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University School of Engineering and Technology, and Department of Orthodontics and Oral Facial Genetics, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Ind.

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States of America

2013

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. Electronic address:

Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

2012

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801

2011

Professor and chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis; professor, Department of Orthodontics, Indiana School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Ind

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Urbana, IL,

2010

Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Ind

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, and, W.M. Keck Center for Comparative and Functional Genomics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820

2009

Professor, Biomechanics Laboratory, Indiana University School of Dentistry and Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indianapolis, Ind

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, and

2008

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana

2007

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (A.-L.W., J.-H.K., C.Z., J.C.), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801

Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University School of Engineering and Technology; Orthodontics, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Ind.

2006

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University School of Engineering and Technology, and Orthodontics, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Ind

2005

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

2004

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 S. Goodwin Ave. B107, 61801, Urbana, IL, USA

2003

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 S. Goodwin Avenue B107, Urbana, IL 61801 USA

2002

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA

2001

West Lafayette and Indianapolis, Ind

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 South Goodwin Avenue, B107, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

2000

Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 601 South Goodwin Avenue, B107, Urbana, IL 61801

1999

From the Department of Cell and Structural Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indiana 46202.

1996

J. Chen and S. L. Schreiber, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

1995

Biomechanics and Biomaterials Research Center, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis * Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5186 ** Department of Oral Facial Development, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5186

1994

Biomechanics and Biomaterial Research Center, IUPUI, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University at Indianapolis, USA

Prominent publications by Jie Chen

KOL-Index: 14034 . Nutrient overload is associated with the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes. High plasma concentrations of amino acids have been found to correlate with insulin resistance. At the cellular level, excess amino acids impair insulin signaling, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. Here, we report that STAT3 plays a key role in amino acid dampening of ...
Known for Insulin Signaling | Amino Acids | Signal Transducer | Phosphorylation Stat3
KOL-Index: 13694 . Chemotaxis allows neutrophils to seek out sites of infection and inflammation. The asymmetric accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) at the leading edge provides the driving force for protrusion and is essential for the development and maintenance of neutrophil polarity. The mechanism that governs actin cytoskeleton dynamics and assembly in neutrophils has been extensively explored ...
Known for Actin Cytoskeleton | Neutrophil Chemotaxis | Mammalian Target | Rapamycin Complex
KOL-Index: 13616 . The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 has been proposed to be one of the mediators that link obesity-derived chronic inflammation with insulin resistance. Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been found to impact insulin sensitivity under various pathological conditions, through serine phosphorylation and inhibition of insulin receptor substrate by the ...
Known for Insulin Resistance | Mammalian Target | Hepatocellular Cell | Mtor Il6
KOL-Index: 13443 . Rapamycin inhibits differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblasts, a tissue culture model for skeletal muscle differentiation. The mechanism by which a rapamycin-sensitive signaling pathway regulates myogenesis is largely unknown. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation, but its role in myogenesis has not been examined directly. Here we ...
Known for Mammalian Target | Muscle Differentiation | C2c12 Myogenesis | Antineoplastic Blotting
KOL-Index: 12883 . Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressive agent, binds two proteins: the FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) and the FKBP-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP). A crystal structure of the ternary complex of human FKBP12, rapamycin, and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain of human FRAP at a resolution of 2.7 angstroms revealed the two proteins bound together as a result of the ability of ...
Known for Binding Domain | Rapamycin Proteins | Alcohol Acceptor | Secondary Protein Structure
KOL-Index: 12842 . Syncytia arising from the fusion of cells expressing the HIV-1-encoded Env gene with cells expressing the CD4/CXCR4 complex undergo apoptosis following the nuclear translocation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 (p53(S15)), p53-dependent upregulation of Bax and activation of the mitochondrial death pathway. p53(S15) phosphorylation is ...
Known for P53 Apoptosis | Cyclin Cdk1 | Nuclear Fusion | Cells Hiv1
KOL-Index: 12533 . The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for skeletal myogenesis through controlling distinct cellular pathways. The importance of the canonical mTOR complex 1 signaling components, including raptor, S6K1, and Rheb, had been suggested in muscle maintenance, growth, and metabolism. However, the role of those components in myogenic differentiation is not entirely clear. In this ...
Known for Skeletal Myogenesis | Insulin Receptor | Myogenic Differentiation | Mammalian Target
KOL-Index: 12489 . It has been widely proposed that signaling by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Evidence for this hypothesis is largely based on studies that used stimuli that activate mTOR via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB)-dependent mechanism. However, the stimulation of signaling by ...
Known for Mammalian Target | Muscle Hypertrophy | Rapamycin Signaling | Protein Kinase
KOL-Index: 12283 . Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) controls a wide range of cellular and developmental processes, but its regulation remains incompletely understood. Through a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified XPLN (exchange factor found in platelets, leukemic, and neuronal tissues), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases, as an interacting partner of mTOR. In ...
Known for Mtorc2 Akt | Gef Activity | Xpln Regulation | Mammalian Target
KOL-Index: 12001 . Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a critical mediator of mitogenic activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a master regulator of mammalian cell growth and proliferation. The mechanism by which PA activates mTORC1 signaling has remained unknown. Here, we report that PA selectively stimulates mTORC1 but not mTORC2 kinase activity in cells and in vitro. Furthermore, ...
Known for Mammalian Target | Phosphatidic Acid | Rapamycin Complex | 1 Mtorc1
KOL-Index: 11803 . BACKGROUND: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth and proliferation via the downstream targets ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). We have identified phosphatidic acid (PA) as a mediator of mitogenic activation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we set out to test the hypotheses that phospholipase ...
Known for Cdc42 Activation | Mtor Signaling | Protein Kinases | Pld1 Regulates
KOL-Index: 11657 . The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) assembles a signaling network essential for the regulation of cell growth, which has emerged as a major target of anticancer therapies. The tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and 2 (TSC1/2) proteins and their target, the small GTPase Rheb, constitute a key regulatory pathway upstream of mTOR. Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid are ...
Known for Mtor Pathway | Phospholipase D1 | Rheb Activation | Cell Growth
KOL-Index: 11343 . Adipocyte differentiation is a developmental process that is critical for metabolic homeostasis and nutrient signaling. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates nutrient signaling to regulate cell growth, proliferation, and diverse cellular differentiation. It has been reported that rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR and an immunosuppressant, blocks adipocyte differentiation, but ...
Known for Mammalian Target | Amino Acids | Peroxisome Proliferator | Activated Receptor
KOL-Index: 11320 . Rapamycin-sensitive signaling is required for skeletal muscle differentiation and remodeling. In cultured myoblasts, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to regulate differentiation at different stages through distinct mechanisms, including one that is independent of mTOR kinase activity. However, the kinase-independent function of mTOR remains controversial, and no ...
Known for Muscle Regeneration | Knockout Mice | Rapamycin Mtor | Regulates Skeletal
KOL-Index: 11169 . The rapamycin-sensitive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex, mTORC1, regulates cell growth in response to mitogenic signals and amino acid availability. Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product, phosphatidic acid, have been established as mediators of mitogenic activation of mTORC1. In this study, we identify a novel role for PLD1 in an amino acid-sensing pathway. We find that amino ...
Known for Amino Acid | Mtorc1 Activation | Class Iii | Mechanistic Target

Key People For Mammalian Target

Top KOLs in the world
#1
David M Sabatini
mechanistic target rag gtpases amino acids
#2
Michael Nip Hall
actin cytoskeleton saccharomyces cerevisiae cell growth
#3
Nahum Sonenberg
translation initiation binding protein messenger rna
#4
George Thomas
s6 kinase ribosomal protein ribosome biogenesis
#5
John Blenis
s6 kinase cell growth ribosomal protein
#6
Kun‐Liang Kunliang
hippo pathway cell growth protein kinase

Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana‐Champaign, IL, USA | Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address: jiechen@illinois.ed