Gregory P Copenhaver: Influence Statistics

Gregory P Copenhaver

Gregory P Copenhaver

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA | ...

Gregory P Copenhaver: Expert Impact

Concepts for which Gregory P Copenhaver has direct influence: Meiotic recombination , Arabidopsis thaliana , Tetrad analysis , Dna synthesis , Plant crossing , Synergid cell death , Male meiosis .

Gregory P Copenhaver: KOL impact

Concepts related to the work of other authors for which for which Gregory P Copenhaver has influence: Meiotic recombination , Arabidopsis thaliana , Dna methylation , Pollen tube , Rna polymerase , Transposable elements , Situ hybridization .

KOL Resume for Gregory P Copenhaver

Year
2021

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

2020

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States of America

2019

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599.

2018

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3280, USA; email:

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3280, USA.

2017

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, United States

2016

Department of Biology and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599-3280, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

2015

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3280, USA.

Department of Biology and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280;

2014

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280; and

2013

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599, USA

2012

Department of Biology and The Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599–3280, USA.

2010

Gregory P. Copenhaver is in the Department of Biology and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

2009

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3280, USA

2008

Luke E. Berchowitz and Gregory P. Copenhaver are at the Department of Biology and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.

2007

Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

Chromatin, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America

2006

Department of Biology and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599

2005

Department of Biology and The Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.

2004

Department of Biology and The Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

2003

Department of Biology and The Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, The University of North Carolina atChapel Hill, CB 3280, Coker Hall 305, 27599, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

2002

Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599

2000

Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

1999

University of Chicago, 1103 E. 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

1998

Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637

1996

Biology Department, Washington University, Campus Box 1137, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA

1995

Biology Department and Center for Plant Science and Biotechnology, Washington University, campus Box 1137, One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA

1994

Biology Department, Washington UniversityBox 1137 One Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA

Prominent publications by Gregory P Copenhaver

KOL-Index: 12273 . Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) is important for activation of ribosomal RNA transcription and belongs to a family of proteins containing nucleic acid binding domains, termed HMG-boxes, with similarity to High Mobility Group (HMG) chromosomal proteins. Proteins in this family can be sequence-specific or highly sequence-tolerant binding proteins. We show that Xenopus UBF can be classified ...
Known for Nucleic Acid | Rna Polymerase | Ubf Binding | Proteins Sequence
KOL-Index: 10643 . Upstream binding factor (UBF) is an important transactivator of RNA polymerase I and is a member of a family of proteins that contain nucleic acid binding domains named high-mobility-group (HMG) boxes because of their similarity to HMG chromosomal proteins. UBF is a highly sequence-tolerant DNA-binding protein for which no binding consensus sequence has been identified. Therefore, it has ...
Known for Upstream Binding Factor | Rna Polymerase | Dimerization Domain | Dna Binding
KOL-Index: 10473 . Meiosis is a specialized eukaryotic cell division that generates haploid gametes required for sexual reproduction. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover (CO). Meiotic CO frequency varies along the physical length of chromosomes and is determined by hierarchical mechanisms, including epigenetic organization, for example ...
Known for Arabidopsis Thaliana | Meiotic Crossover Frequency | Plant Dna | Repetitive Sequences
KOL-Index: 9858 . During angiosperm reproduction, one of the two synergid cells within the female gametophyte undergoes cell death prior to fertilization. The pollen tube enters the female gametophyte by growing into the synergid cell that undergoes cell death and releases its two sperm cells within the degenerating synergid cytoplasm to effect double fertilization. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and ...
Known for Pollen Tube | Synergid Cell | Female Gametophyte | Death Arabidopsis
KOL-Index: 9301 . During meiotic recombination, induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) are processed into crossovers (COs) and non-COs (NCO); the former are required for proper chromosome segregation and fertility. DNA synthesis is essential in current models of meiotic recombination pathways and includes only leading strand DNA synthesis, but few genes crucial for DNA synthesis have been tested genetically ...
Known for Dna Replication | Meiotic Recombination | Arabidopsis Thaliana | Plant Crossing
KOL-Index: 9195 . During meiosis, chromatin undergoes extensive changes to facilitate recombination, homolog pairing, and chromosome segregation. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and meiotic processes, we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) to map open chromatin during the transition from mitosis to meiosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces ...
Known for Saccharomyces Cerevisiae | Meiotic Double | Recombination Hotspots | Genetic Dna Breaks
KOL-Index: 8951 . Whole-genome duplication through the formation of diploid gametes is a major route for polyploidization, speciation, and diversification in plants. The prevalence of polyploids in adverse climates led us to hypothesize that abiotic stress conditions can induce or stimulate diploid gamete production. In this study, we show that short periods of cold stress induce the production of diploid ...
Known for Diploid Male Gametes | Cold Stress | Radial Microtubule Arrays | Arabidopsis Thaliana
KOL-Index: 8547 . Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) QUARTET (QRT) genes are required for pollen separation during normal floral development. In qrt mutants, the four products of microsporogenesis remain fused and pollen grains are released as tetrads. In Arabidopsis, tetrad analysis in qrt mutants has been used to map all five centromeres, easily distinguish sporophytic from gametophytic mutations, and ...
Known for Arabidopsis Pollen | Methylesterase Gene | Floral Development | Pme Activity
KOL-Index: 8508 . Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. ...
Known for Resistance Genes | Recombination Genetic | Linkage Disequilibrium | Nbs Lrr
KOL-Index: 8117 . In Arabidopsis thaliana ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA genes or rDNA) are grouped in two nucleolus organizer regions(NORs) that together comprise approximately 6% of the genome. The map positions of the NORs relative to other genetic markers are unknown. It was found that the restriction endonuclease Hindlll cuts once in some but not all rRNA genes to yield strain-specific RFLPs of 100-700 kb ...
Known for Arabidopsis Thaliana | Nucleolus Organizer | Plant Dna | Rrna Genes
KOL-Index: 8066 . PRDM9 directs human meiotic crossover hot spots to intergenic sequence motifs, whereas budding yeast hot spots overlap regions of low nucleosome density (LND) in gene promoters. To investigate hot spots in plants, which lack PRDM9, we used coalescent analysis of genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Crossovers increased toward gene promoters and terminators, and hot spots were ...
Known for Hot Spots | Gene Promoters | Meiotic Crossover | Arabidopsis Proteins
KOL-Index: 7847 . We previously proposed a "counting model" for meiotic crossover interference, in which double-strand breaks occur independently and a fixed number of noncrossovers occur between neighboring crossovers. Whereas in some organisms (group I) this simple model alone describes the crossover distribution, in other organisms (group II) an additional assumption--that some crossovers lack ...
Known for Saccharomyces Cerevisiae | Crossover Interference | Doublestrand Breaks | Holliday Junctions

Key People For Meiotic Recombination

Top KOLs in the world
#1
Nancy E Kleckner
meiotic recombination escherichia coli tn10 transposition
#2
Scott Keeney
meiotic recombination dsb formation saccharomyces cerevisiae
#3
Michael J Lichten
meiotic recombination saccharomyces cerevisiae heteroduplex dna
#4
Alain G Nicolas
saccharomyces cerevisiae meiotic recombination gene conversion
#5
G Shirleen Roeder
chromosome synapsis saccharomyces cerevisiae meiotic recombination
#6
Bernard de Massy
meiotic recombination saccharomyces cerevisiae dsb formation

Department of Biology and the Integrative Program for Biological and Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA | Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medic