• KOL
    • Movement Therapy
    • David M Morris
    • David M Morris: Influence Statistics

      David M Morris

      David M Morris

      Show email address

      University of Alabama Birmingham, Dept. of Physical Therapy | Department of Physical Therapy, UAB, Birmingham, AL, USA. | Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama ...

      Is this your profile? manage_accounts Claim your profile content_copy Copy URL code Embed Link to your profile

      David M Morris:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichDavid M Morrishas direct influence:Movement therapy,Excite trial,Function restraint,Plegic hands,Motor function,Induced movement,Chronic stroke,Ambulatory monitoring.

      David M Morris:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which David M Morris has influence:Chronic stroke,Upper limb,Motor function,Movement therapy,Cerebral palsy,Virtual reality,Outcome measures.

      KOL Resume for David M Morris

      Year
      2021

      University of Alabama Birmingham, Dept. of Physical Therapy

      2020

      Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

      2019

      From the Departments of Psychology (Drs Taub, Mark, and Uswatte, Mss Bishop-McKay, Taylor, Reder, and Adams, and Mr Womble), Physical Therapy (Drs Morris and Uswatte), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Mark), Neurology (Drs Mark and Szaflarski), Occupational Therapy (Dr Rimmer), and UAB/Lakeshore Research Collaborative (Dr Rimmer and Mr Dew), University of Alabama at Birmingham; Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Auburn, Alabama (Dr Liu); National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Pickett); Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado and Denver Veteran's Medical Center, Denver (Dr Brenner); Rocky Mountain MIRECC, Denver, Colorado (Ms Stearns-Yoder); and Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Stevens) and Psychology (Mr Rothman), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.

      2018

      Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1716 9th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

      2017

      Department of Physical Therapy; UAB Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, School of Health Professions Building 360X, Birmingham, AL 35294-1212 USA

      2013

      From the Departments of Psychology (E.T., G.U., V.W.M., J.B., M.H.B., C.B., A.D., S.B.-M.), Physical Therapy (G.U., D.M.M.), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (V.W.M.), and Neurology (V.W.M.), University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

      2012

      Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

      2010

      From the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine (S.L.W., S.R.B.), Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology (S.L.W.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga; Methodology and Data Analysis Center (P.A.T.), Sanford Research/University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD; Division of Biostatistics (J.P.M.), Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo; Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy at the School of Dentistry (C.J.W.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif; School of Allied Medical Professions (D.S.L.), The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Physical Therapy (D.M.M.), Department of Psychology (G.U., E.T.), University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala; Department of Physical Therapy (K.L.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (L.S.), University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.

      2009

      Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

      2008

      Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA

      University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL

      2006

      From the Department of Psychology (G.U., E.T.), University of Alabama at Birmingham; Department of Physical Therapy (G.U., D.M.), School of Allied Health; University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Department of Physical Therapy (K.L.), University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; and Division of Biostatistics (P.A.T.), Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

      Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Related Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA

      2005

      Division of Physical Therapy, School of Allied Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham

      2003

      Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1705 University Boulevard, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA

      2001

      From the Division of Physical Therapy (Morris), Departments of Psychology (Uswatte, Cook, Taub) and Physical Therapy (Crago), University of Alabama; and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Birmingham VA Medical Center (Taub), Birmingham, AL

      Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.

      1997

      Division of Physical Therapy, 900 19th St. South, RM 102, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!
      Sample of concepts for which David M Morris is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      intensity cimt #1
      recruitment variable #2
      ethical aspects recruitment #2
      multiple facets recruitment #2
      lecimt protocol #2
      therapy recruitment #2
      clinician tasks #2
      common element persons #2
      retention excite trial #2
      towel wmft score #2
      rehabilitation videotape #2
      moreaffected activities #2
      procedures extremity #2
      complete lecimt protocol #2
      efficacious therapy result #2
      activities life situations #2
      physical stroke rehabilitation #2
      transference motor skills #2
      time periods training #2
      wmft score #2
      box pencil #2
      development cimt #2
      basic monkeys #2
      development supervised #2
      lecimt #2
      study wmft #2
      monkeys somatosensory deafferentation #2
      cimt protocol #2
      checklist scoring sheets #2
      moreaffected #2
      pencil towel #2
      analysis wmft #2
      wmft score cimt #2
      physical severity illness #2
      result therapy approach #2
      evaluation multisite #2
      physical therapy recruitment #2
      positive intervention protocol #2
      moreaffected intensity #2
      upper extremity capabilities #2
      variable recruitment efficacy #2
      positive protocol #2
      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!

      Prominent publications by David M Morris

      KOL-Index: 14577

      CONTEXT: Single-site studies suggest that a 2-week program of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for patients more than 1 year after stroke who maintain some hand and wrist movement can improve upper extremity function that persists for at least 1 year.

      OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a 2-week multisite program of CIMT vs usual and customary care on improvement in upper extremity function among patients who had a first stroke within the previous 3 to 9 months.

      DESIGN AND ...

      Known for Upper Extremity Function | 9 Months | Cimt Patients | Movement Therapy | 1 Year
      KOL-Index: 10561

      BACKGROUND: Constraint-Induced Movement therapy (CI therapy) is shown to reduce disability, increase use of the more affected arm/hand, and promote brain plasticity for individuals with upper extremity hemiparesis post-stroke. Randomized controlled trials consistently demonstrate that CI therapy is superior to other rehabilitation paradigms, yet it is available to only a small minority of the estimated 1.2 million chronic stroke survivors with upper extremity disability. The current ...

      Known for Upper Extremity | Comparative Effectiveness | Outpatient Stroke | Quality Life | Video Game Rehabilitation
      KOL-Index: 10115

      BACKGROUND: The aim of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is to promote use of a limb that is functionally impaired after a stroke. In one form of CIMT to treat upper limb impairment, use of the less severely affected arm is restricted for many hours each weekday over 2 consecutive weeks. The EXCITE trial has previously shown the efficacy of this intervention for patients 3-9 months poststroke who were followed-up for the next 12 months. We assessed the retention of improvements ...

      Known for Upper Limb | Stroke Survivors | Movement Therapy | Function Restraint | 12 Months
      KOL-Index: 8869

      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In research on Constraint-Induced Movement (CI) therapy, a structured interview, the Motor Activity Log (MAL), is used to assess how stroke survivors use their more-impaired arm outside the laboratory. This article examines the psychometrics of the 14-item version of this instrument in 2 chronic stroke samples with mild-to-moderate upper-extremity hemiparesis.

      METHODS: Participants (n=41) in the first study completed MALs before and after CI therapy or a placebo ...

      Known for Motor Activity Log | Qom Scale | Stroke Survivors | Internal Consistency | Impaired Arm
      KOL-Index: 8629

      OBJECTIVE: To examine the reliability of the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) for assessing upper extremity motor function in adults with hemiplegia.

      DESIGN: Interrater and test-retest reliability.

      SETTING: A clinical research laboratory at a university medical center.

      PATIENTS: A sample of convenience of 24 subjects with chronic hemiplegia (onset >1yr), showing moderate motor impairment.

      INTERVENTION: The WMFT includes 15 functional tasks. Performances were timed and rated by using a ...

      Known for Functional Ability | Function Test | Internal Consistency | Wolf Motor | Assessing Upper
      KOL-Index: 8435

      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Constraint-Induced Movement therapy (CI therapy) is a neurorehabilitation technique developed to improve use of the more affected upper extremity after stroke. A number of studies have reported positive effects for this intervention, but an experiment with a credible placebo control group has not yet been published.

      METHODS: We conducted a placebo-controlled trial of CI therapy in patients with mild to moderate chronic (mean=4.5 years after stroke) motor deficit ...

      Known for Movement Therapy | Function Restraint | Patients Chronic Stroke | Controlled Trial | Upper Extremity
      KOL-Index: 8399

      BACKGROUND: Data from monkeys with deafferented forelimbs and humans after stroke indicate that tests of the motor capacity of impaired extremities can overestimate their spontaneous use. Before the Motor Activity Log (MAL) was developed, no instruments assessed spontaneous use of a hemiparetic arm outside the treatment setting.

      OBJECTIVE: To study the MAL's reliability and validity for assessing real-world quality of movement (QOM scale) and amount of use (AOU scale) of the hemiparetic ...

      Known for Motor Activity | Hemiparetic Arm | Qom Scale | Stroke Survivors | Treatment Setting
      KOL-Index: 7373

      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Constraint-induced movement therapy is a set of treatments for rehabilitating motor function after central nervous system damage. We assessed the roles of its 2 main components.

      METHODS: A 2 × 2 factorial components analysis with random assignment was conducted. The 2 factors were type of training and presence/absence of a set of techniques to facilitate transfer of therapeutic gains from the laboratory to the life situation (Transfer Package; TP). Participants ...

      Known for Chronic Stroke | Motor Function | Spontaneous Arm | Type Training | Daily Life
      KOL-Index: 7364

      The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) has been used in rehabilitation studies of chronic stroke patients, but until now its psychometric properties have not been evaluated in patients with subacute stroke. Two hundred twenty-nine participants with subacute stroke (3-9 months postinjury) at 7 research sites met inclusion criteria for the EXCITE Trial and were randomized into immediate or delayed (by 1 year) constraint-induced movement therapy treatment. All evaluations were undertaken by ...

      Known for Subacute Stroke | Excite Trial | Motor Function | Illness Analysis | Psychometric Properties

      The EXCITE Stroke Trial


      [ PUBLICATION ]
      KOL-Index: 7041

      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been shown to improve upper extremity function in stroke survivors at both early and late stages after stroke, the comparison between participants within the same cohort but receiving the intervention at different time points has not been undertaken. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare functional improvements between stroke participants randomized to receive this intervention within 3 to 9 ...

      Known for Stroke Participants | Motor Function | Time Points | Therapy Cimt | 12 Months
      KOL-Index: 6433

      This article describes the study design, methodological considerations, and demographic characteristics of a phase III RCT to determine if 1) constraint-induced therapy (CI therapy) can be applied with therapeutic success 3 to 9 months after stroke across different sites, 2) gains that might occur persist over 2 years, 3) initial level of motor ability determines responsiveness to CI therapy, and 4) the treatment effect differs between those treated before 9 months and after 1 year. Six ...

      Known for Movement Therapy | Upper Extremity Function | Topic Recovery | 9 Months | Multisite Randomized
      KOL-Index: 6222

      Participant recruitment is considered the most difficult aspect of the research process. Despite the integral role of recruitment in randomized clinical trials, publication of data defining the recruitment effort is not routine in rehabilitation initiatives. The recruitment process for the Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation (EXCITE) trial illustrates obstacles to and strategies for participant accrual and retention that are inherent in rehabilitation clinical trials. The ...

      Known for Participant Recruitment | Excite Trial | Lessons Learned | Informed Consent | Stroke Rehabilitation

      Key People For Movement Therapy

      Top KOLs in the world
      #1
      Edward Taub
      cortical reorganization movement therapy chronic stroke
      #2
      Gitendra Uswatte
      chronic stroke movement therapy multiple sclerosis
      #3
      Steven L Wolf
      stroke recovery upper extremity excite trial
      #4
      David M Morris
      movement therapy motor function chronic stroke
      #5
      Jean E Crago
      movement therapy learned nonuse wolf motor function test
      #6
      Carolee Joyce Winstein
      motor learning stroke survivors functional independence

      University of Alabama Birmingham, Dept. of Physical Therapy | Department of Physical Therapy, UAB, Birmingham, AL, USA. | Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. | Department of Physical Therapy, Univ

    Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

    Copyright © 2023 Key Opinion Leaders, LLC.