Lowell S Young,: Influence Statistics

Lowell S Young,

Lowell S Young,

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, San Francisco, California, USA | Kuzell Institute, CPMCRI, San Francisco, CA | Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and ...

Lowell S Young : Expert Impact

Concepts for which Lowell S Young has direct influence: Mycobacterium avium , Mycobacterium avium complex , Avium complex , Beige mice , Graft rejection , Complex mycobacterium , Human macrophages .

Lowell S Young : KOL impact

Concepts related to the work of other authors for which for which Lowell S Young has influence: Febrile neutropenia , Mycobacterium avium , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Neutropenic patients , Bacterial infections , Bone marrow , Acute leukemia .

KOL Resume for Lowell S Young,

Year
2012

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, San Francisco, California, USA

2010

Kuzell Institute, CPMCRI, San Francisco, CA

2009

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, 2200 Webster Street, San Francisco, California 94115

2008

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco

2007

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis & Infectious Diseases at California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California

2006

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California.

2005

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California 94115

Research Institute, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California

2004

Kuzell Institute, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California

2003

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, and

2002

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, Division of Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center, 02114, Boston, Massachusetts

Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, 94115, San Francisco, California

Infectious Diseases Society of America, Alexandria, Virginia

2001

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco

2000

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, and

1999

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, San Francisco, and

1998

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California, USA

1997

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, 2200 Webster Street, San Francisco, California, 94115

From the Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Alexandria, Virginia

1996

California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco 94115, US

1995

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco 94115, USA.

1994

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California 90027.

1993

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center and University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, California, USA

1992

From St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee; the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; the University of Maryland Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Hospital and Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, New York, New York; and the Kuzell Institute, San Francisco, California

Kuzell Institute, San Francisco, CA USA

1991

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis, and Infectious Diseases, 2200 Webster Street, Room 305, San Francisco, CA 94115

Pacific Presbyterian Medical Center, San Francisco, United States

1990

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis & Infectious Diseases, San Francisco, USA

Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, California 94301.

1989

Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles 90027.

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, 2200 Webster Street, 94415, San Francisco, California, USA

1988

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, 2200 Webster Street, R-305, 94115-1896, San Francisco, California, USA

1987

Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles 90027.

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, 2200 Webster Street, R305, San Francisco, CA 94115, U.S.A.

1986

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, Pacific Presbyterian Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA

Clinical Microbiology Laboratory and Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles Medical CenterLos Angeles, California 90024, U.S.A

1985

Department of Infectious Diseases, University of California School of Medicine, Center for Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California USA

1984

Los Angeles, California USA

1983

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California, USA

1982

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of CaliforniaLos Angeles, California 90024, U.S.A

1981

University of California, Los Angeles

1980

Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90024

1979

From the Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology (Human Immunobiology Group), Radiation Therapy, Pathology, and Psychiatry, University of California at Los Angeles, The Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California 90024

Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California School of Medicine, The Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California, USA

1978

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, Calif.

1977

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90024

Los Angeles, California, USA

1976

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, and Department of Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine

1975

Department of Medicine, University of California Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90024

1973

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Center for the Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024

New York, New York USA

1971

Infectious Disease Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York 10021

1970

Memorial Hosp. and Cornell Univ. Coll., New York, NY

1967

Department of Medicine Cornell University Medical College, New York, N.Y.

Prominent publications by Lowell S Young,

KOL-Index: 17516 . Levofloxacin, ofloxacin, and Bay Y 3118 are new fluoroquinolones with variable in vitro bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities against the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The potential therapeutic activities of these agents both alone and combined with ethambutol were evaluated in a human macrophage test system and in the beige mouse animal test system with MAC strain 101. Bay Y ...
Known for Mycobacterium Avium | Beige Mice | Ethambutol Levofloxacin | Untreated Controls
KOL-Index: 17230 . Moxifloxacin activity against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) was evaluated in vitro against 25 strains. The MIC was determined to range from 0.125 to 2.0 microg/ml. In addition, U937 macrophage monolayers infected with MAC strain 101 (serovar 1) were treated with moxifloxacin (0.25 to 8 microg/ml) daily, and the number of intracellular bacteria was quantitated after 4 days. Moxifloxacin ...
Known for Mycobacterium Avium | Combination Ethambutol | Activity Moxifloxacin | 100 Day
KOL-Index: 14747 . In a prospective randomized trial, febrile granulocytopenic patients received either moxalactam plus piperacillin or moxalactam plus amikacin as initial empiric antimicrobial therapy. Most patients were also given prophylactic vitamin K. The overall response rates for the two regimens were similar (105 of 136, or 77 percent, for moxalactam plus piperacillin versus 107 of 136, or 79 ...
Known for Moxalactam Piperacillin | Granulocytopenic Patients | Aged Agranulocytosis | Drug Therapy
KOL-Index: 14318 . Rifamycins are active against slowly growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii, but the majority of rifamycins thus far investigated both in vitro and in vivo are inactive or have only modest activity against the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). We investigated the activity of three doses of the semisynthetic benzoxazinorifamycin KRM 1648, alone ...
Known for Mycobacterium Avium | Combination Krm | Beige Mouse Model | Mac Infection
KOL-Index: 13945 . Vitamin D3 (D3) has been shown to activate several macrophage functions. To determine whether D3 could activate macrophages to kill or inhibit intracellular growth of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), human monocyte-derived macrophages were treated with D3 (10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) 24 hr before or for 48 hr after MAC infection. All three concentrations were associated with inhibition ...
Known for Human Macrophages | Mycobacterium Avium Complex | Vitamin D3 | Gm Csf
KOL-Index: 13486 . OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have demonstrated that mycobacteria can interact with epithelial cells, a property which can be important for establishing infection. In this study we investigated comparatively the ability of Mycobacterium avium, M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis to invade and multiply within HEp-2 epithelial cells. DESIGN: The ability to invade and to multiply intracellularly ...
Known for Mycobacterium Avium | Epithelial Cells | Tuberculosis Smegmatis | Ability Invade
KOL-Index: 13320 . Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a critical cytokine that affects many of the biological functions of NK cells and T cells. We have previously shown that both human and murine NK cells are important in host defense against Mycobacterium avium complex and act by secreting cytokines that induce macrophages to inhibit the growth of intracellular M. avium. To define the role of IL-12 in M. avium ...
Known for Killer Cells | Mycobacterium Avium | Culture Supernatant | Host Defense
KOL-Index: 12786 . Current evidence suggests that the gut is the chief portal of entry for organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in AIDS patients. Bacterial invasion of intestinal mucosa presumably occurs through epithelial cells, and M cells in the Peyer's patches, where the bacteria have contact with immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and T and B lymphocytes. As mucosal macrophages are ...
Known for Mycobacterium Avium | Infection Mac | Gmcsf Mcsf | Factor Csf
KOL-Index: 12683 . The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a common cause of disseminated infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and is increasingly seen as a cause of infection in other immunocompromised patients. Traditional antimycobacterial therapy often is ineffective, and there is a clear need for antibiotics with proven activity against the MAC. Three agents, amikacin, ...
Known for Beige Mice | Avium Complex | Disseminated Mycobacterium | Colony Count
KOL-Index: 12519 . KRM 1648 is a 4-aminobenzoxazine derivative of rifamycin S with potent in vitro activity against the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC); the MIC for 90% of 24 MAC isolates from AIDS patients was 0.25 microgram/ml as determined by a radiometric broth macrodilution assay. KRM 1648 was bactericidal for MAC isolates in Middlebrook 7H9 broth, with a reduction in viability of 1 to 4 orders of ...
Known for Krm 1648 | Mycobacterium Avium Complex | Human Macrophages | Aids Patients
KOL-Index: 11965 . Invasive, disease-associated members of the Mycobacterium avium complex are facultative intracellular pathogens of mammalian macrophages. The mechanism(s) by which M. avium is ingested by mononuclear phagocytes is unknown. We examined the role of membrane receptors on macrophages as well as the role of opsonic components of the serum (complement, fibronectin, C-reactive protein and ...
Known for Human Macrophages | Mycobacterium Avium Complex | Binding Avium | Cell Surface Receptors

Key People For Mycobacterium Avium

Top KOLs in the world
#1
Luiz Eduardo M Bermudez
mycobacterium avium epithelial cells human macrophages
#2
Richard J Wallace
nontuberculous mycobacteria mycobacterium abscessus united states
#3
Charles Fordham von Reyn
united states mycobacterium avium hiv infection
#4
Michael D Iseman
mycobacterium avium resistant tuberculosis pulmonary disease
#5
Joseph Oliver Falkinham
mycobacterium avium nontuberculous mycobacteria united states
#6
Charles Robert Horsburgh
united states south africa mycobacterium avium

Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, San Francisco, California, USA | Kuzell Institute, CPMCRI, San Francisco, CA | Kuzell Institute for Arthritis and Infectious Diseases, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, 2200