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    • Herbert D Kleber: Influence Statistics

      Herbert D Kleber

      Herbert D Kleber

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      New York State Psychiatric institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. | Columbia University, New York, NY, USA | Herbert D. Kleber is a professor ...

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      Herbert D Kleber:Expert Impact

      Concepts for whichHerbert D Kleberhas direct influence:Opiate addicts,Cocaine dependence,Cocaine abuse,Opiate withdrawal,Opioid addicts,Cocaine abusers,Methadone maintenance,Drug dependence.

      Herbert D Kleber:KOL impact

      Concepts related to the work of other authors for whichfor which Herbert D Kleber has influence:Substance abuse,Cocaine dependence,Methadone maintenance,Opioid withdrawal,Drug addiction,United states,Psychiatric disorders.

      KOL Resume for Herbert D Kleber

      Year
      2017

      New York State Psychiatric institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.

      2016

      Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

      2015

      New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA

      2013

      Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

      2012

      From the Division on Substance Abuse, Columbia University, and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York; the Institute for Behavior and Health, Rockville, Md.; and Georgetown Medical School, Washington, DC.

      2011

      From the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

      Department of Psychiatry, Division of Substance Abuse, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

      2010

      Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA and

      2009

      Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York

      2008

      Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, New York

      2007

      Department of Psychiatry, Division on Substance Abuse, Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA

      2006

      Division on Substance Abuse, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York (Drs Comer, Sullivan, Rothenberg, and Kleber)

      Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York

      2005

      Division on Substance Abuse, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University (Drs Collins and Kleber and Ms Heitler)

      College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USAView further author information

      From the Rocky Mountain Poison Center, Denver, CO 80204; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19106; and Columbia University, New York, NY 10032.

      2004

      Columbia University, College of Physicians & Surgeons
Department of Psychiatry
1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 66
New York
NY 10032
USA

      2003

      From the Division on Substance Abuse, Columbia University, New York.

      2002

      Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA

      2001

      Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA

      2000

      The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

      *Columbia University New York, New York. raw9@columbia.edu

      1999

      The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, Columbia University, NY USA

      1998

      Division on Substance Abuse, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

      1996

      Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA), Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

      1995

      Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY

      1994

      Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, Columbia University, New York, NY 10019.

      1992

      Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven; and Department of Psychiatry, University of California at Los Angeles.

      Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and The Connecticut Mental Health Center, Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT, USA

      1990

      Yale University School of Medicine and the Director, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.

      1989

      Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

      1988

      Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, USA

      1987

      Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven 06519.

      Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, APT Foundation, New Haven, CT, USA

      1986

      From the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Connecticut Mental Health Center, Drug Dependence Unit, New Haven, CT USA

      Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine; Director, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center and Addiction Prevention Treatment Foundation, New Haven, Connecticut

      1985

      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, and Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut. Send reprint requests to Dr. Rounsaville, Connecticut Mental Health Center, 98 Park Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine.

      Yale University School of Medicine, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center and Addiction, Prevention and Treatment Foundation

      Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut, 06511

      1984

      Yale Medical School, USA

      Department of Connecticut, Mental Health Center Drug Dependence Unit New, Haven, Connecticut, 06519

      1983

      Department of Psychiatry, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Drug Dependence Unit, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

      Yale University School of Medicine, Depression Research Unit, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Drug Dependence Unit, New Haven, Conn. USA

      1982

      Thomas R. Kosten, M.D., Clinical Scholar, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Boris M. Astrachan, M.D, Professor of Psychiatry; Charles E. Riordan, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Herbert D. Kleber, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Connecticut Mental, Health Center, Drug Dependence Unit, 34 Park Street, New Haven, Ct. 06508.

      Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

      1981

      Department of Psychiatry School of Medicine Yale University New Haven, Connecticut 06519

      Addiction-Prevention, Treatment Foundation, USA

      Research Facilities, Fair Oaks Hospital and Substance Abuse Unit, Yale University School of Medicine, Summit, NJ U.S.A.

      1980

      Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, and Research Facilities, Fair Oaks Hospital, Summit, New Jersey U.S.A.

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      Sample of concepts for which Herbert D Kleber is among the top experts in the world.
      Concept World rank
      gloomy treatment programs #1
      opiates tonic inhibition #1
      completely methadone #1
      ambulatory withdrawal #1
      blind inpatient #1
      denial couple #1
      anti craving agents #1
      preoccupation drug #1
      marijuana wesleyan #1
      clonidine naltrexone #1
      mescaline students #1
      male methadone counseling #1
      trough levels study #1
      substanceuse disorder adhd #1
      methadone narcotic addicts #1
      clonidine objective signs #1
      withdrawal severity scores #1
      effects blood prennssure #1
      central monoamine metabolism2–4 #1
      3 buprenorphine #1
      cocaine abstinence rates #1
      neurobiological mechanisms limitations #1
      rapid antagonist induction #1
      we23 clinical impressions #1
      detection rehabilitation #1
      methadone programs expense #1
      treatment approaches combination #1
      opioid addicts methadone #1
      complementary marital #1
      naltrexone groups #1
      campus hallucinogenic drugs #1
      differentiation enduring symptoms #1
      mbrp time #1
      clonidines suppression #1
      multimodality treatment agency #1
      students lysergic #1
      brainbased disease model #1
      opiate addict #1
      objective subjective scales #1
      cocaine longitudinal evaluations #1
      pilot trial desipramine #1
      flupenthixol treatment #1
      numbers admission #1
      preadmission scores #1
      shortterm habits #1
      role professional psychotherapy #1
      pleasure applications #1
      comorbidity diagnosis psychiatry #1
      opioid peptide transmitters #1
      detoxification period phase #1
      Sign-in to see all concepts, it's free!

      Prominent publications by Herbert D Kleber

      KOL-Index: 14443

      Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is prevalent in adult cocaine abusers. Yet, it remains to be determined how the response to cocaine differs in cocaine abusers with ADHD compared to cocaine abusers without ADHD. Further, since ADHD is commonly treated with stimulants, such as methylphenidate (MPH), it is important to examine whether MPH maintenance alters the response to cocaine in cocaine abusers with ADHD. Thus, the first phase of this study compared the response to ...

      Known for Cocaine Abusers | Combination Methylphenidate | Hyperactivity Disorder | Attention Deficit | Subjective Effects
      KOL-Index: 13557

      Abstract.Rationale: Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, is currently approved as a treatment for heroin dependence. However, naltrexone is generally not well accepted by patients, and medication non-compliance is a difficult obstacle to treatment. A sustained-release form of naltrexone may improve compliance. Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the time course, safety, and effectiveness of a depot formulation of naltrexone (Depotrex®). Methods: Twelve heroin-dependent ...

      Known for Depot Naltrexone | Effects Heroin | Low Dose | Opioid Antagonist | Difficult Obstacle
      KOL-Index: 12383

      BACKGROUND: Sublingual buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, yet intravenous buprenorphine misuse occurs. A buprenorphine/naloxone formulation was developed to mitigate this misuse risk. This randomized, double-blind, cross-over study was conducted to assess the intravenous abuse potential of buprenorphine/naloxone compared with buprenorphine in buprenorphine-maintained injection drug users (IDUs).

      METHODS: Intravenous heroin users (n = 12) lived in ...

      Known for Intravenous Buprenorphine | Abuse Liability | Sublingual Adult Analysis | Maintenance Dose | Opioid Dependence
      KOL-Index: 12259

      OBJECTIVE: Dopamine is an important mediator of the reinforcing effects of cocaine, and alterations in dopamine function might be involved in cocaine dependence. The goals of the present study were to characterize pre- and postsynaptic dopamine function in recently detoxified cocaine-dependent subjects. Specifically, dopamine response to an acute amphetamine challenge was assessed in striatal subregions in cocaine-dependent and healthy comparison participants using positron emission ...

      Known for Cocaine Dependence | Dopamine Function | Limbic Striatum | Reinforcing Effects | Monetary Reward
      KOL-Index: 12067

      Striatal dopamine D2 receptors have been implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction. Previous imaging studies showed reduced striatal D2 receptor availability in chronic cocaine abusers, and animal studies suggested that low D2 receptor availability promotes cocaine self-administration. Here, D2 receptor availability was assessed with positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]raclopride in the limbic, associative, and sensori-motor subdivisions of the striatum in 17 recently ...

      Known for Receptor Availability | Cocaine Dependence | Striatum Dopamine | Hc Subjects | Striatal Regions
      KOL-Index: 11814

      CONTEXT: Rapid opioid detoxification with opioid antagonist induction using general anesthesia has emerged as an expensive, potentially dangerous, unproven approach to treat opioid dependence.

      OBJECTIVE: To determine how anesthesia-assisted detoxification with rapid antagonist induction for heroin dependence compared with 2 alternative detoxification and antagonist induction methods.

      DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: A total of 106 treatment-seeking heroin-dependent patients, aged 21 ...

      Known for Naltrexone Induction | General Anesthesia | Opioid Detoxification | Buprenorphine Clonidine | Heroin Dependence
      KOL-Index: 11594

      OBJECTIVE: Previous positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies have demonstrated that cocaine dependence is associated with a decrease in dopamine type 2 and 3 (D(2)/D(3)) receptor binding in cocaine-dependent individuals relative to healthy comparison subjects. However, given the nature of PET imaging, it is possible that the measured decrease in radiotracer binding results from an increase in baseline dopamine levels. The purpose of this study was to measure D(2)/D(3) receptors ...

      Known for Endogenous Dopamine | Cocaine Dependence | Pet Imaging | 3 Receptors | Healthy Comparison Subjects
      KOL-Index: 11462

      CONTEXT: Oral naltrexone can completely antagonize the effects produced by opioid agonists. However, poor compliance with naltrexone has been a major obstacle to the effective treatment of opioid dependence.

      OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a sustained-release depot formulation of naltrexone in treating opioid dependence.

      DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 8-week trial conducted at 2 medical centers.

      PARTICIPANTS: Sixty heroin-dependent ...

      Known for Treatment Opioid Dependence | Release Naltrexone | Controlled Trial | Delayedaction Preparations | Time Dropout
      KOL-Index: 10535

      The goal of this study was to determine D(1) receptor availability in human cocaine-dependent (CD) subjects and matched healthy controls (HCs). In addition, the CD subjects performed cocaine self-administration sessions in order to explore the association between D(1) receptor availability and cocaine-seeking behavior. Twenty-five CD subjects (40+/-4 years, 19M/6 F) and 23 matched HCs (38+/-4 years, 19M/4F) were scanned with PET and the radiotracer [(11)C]NNC 112. During the cocaine ...

      Known for Cocaine Dependence | Dopamine D1 | Receptor Availability | Choice Behavior | Emission Tomography
      KOL-Index: 10435

      CONTEXT: Lofexidine is an alpha-2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is approved in the United Kingdom for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Lofexidine has been reported to have more significant effects on decreasing opioid withdrawal symptoms with less hypotension than clonidine.

      OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that lofexidine is well tolerated and effective in the alleviation of observationally defined opioid withdrawal symptoms in opioid dependent individuals undergoing medically ...

      Known for Opioid Withdrawal | Adrenergic Agonist | Lofexidine Placebo | Study Day | Detoxification Treatment
      KOL-Index: 9221

      BACKGROUND: Previous positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies in nonhuman primates have shown that striatal dopamine type 2/3 (D(2/3)) receptors correlate with social hierarchy in monkeys and that dominant animals exhibit higher levels of D(2/3) receptor binding. The goal of the present study was to examine this phenomena in human subjects using PET and the radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride.

      METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers were scanned with [(11)C]raclopride to measure D(2/3) ...

      Known for Social Status | Dopamine Receptors | D2 3 | Receptor Availability | Nonhuman Primates
      KOL-Index: 9125

      CONTEXT: Auricular acupuncture is widely used to treat cocaine addiction in the United States and Europe. However, evidence from controlled studies regarding this treatment's effectiveness has been inconsistent.

      OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for cocaine addiction.

      DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial conducted from November 1996 to April 1999.

      SETTING: Six community-based clinics in the United States: 3 ...

      Known for Cocaine Addiction | Acupuncture Treatment | United States | Randomized Controlled | Ear Adult

      Key People For Opiate Addicts

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      New York State Psychiatric institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. | Columbia University, New York, NY, USA | Herbert D. Kleber is a professor in the Division on Substance Abuse at Columbia University. | New York State

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