Eugene P Orringer: Influence Statistics

Eugene P Orringer

Eugene P Orringer

University of North Carolina Department of Medicine Division of Hematology & Oncology Chapel Hill North Carolina | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC ...

Eugene P Orringer: Expert Impact

Concepts for which Eugene P Orringer has direct influence: Sickle cell disease , Sickle cell , Pulmonary hypertension , Physical therapy , Sickle cell anemia , Splenic sequestration , Cell disease .

Eugene P Orringer: KOL impact

Concepts related to the work of other authors for which for which Eugene P Orringer has influence: Sickle cell disease , Pulmonary hypertension , Acute chest syndrome , Cell anemia , Patients scd , Nitric oxide , Fetal hemoglobin .

KOL Resume for Eugene P Orringer

Year
2014

University of North Carolina Department of Medicine Division of Hematology & Oncology Chapel Hill North Carolina

2012

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

2011

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA,

Division of Hematology/Oncology

Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program

2010

Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Dr Orringer)

2009

Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;

2008

UNC at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2007

Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

2006

Division of Hematology/Oncology and Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 125 MacNider Building, CB 700, Chapel Hill, NC 27599

2005

Wayne State Univ, Detroit, MI

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

American Univ of Beirut Medical Center, Beuirut

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

2004

Univ. of No. Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine

2003

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

2002

From the Departments of Pharmacology and Medicine, Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH); Department of Hematology, Duke University, Durham, NC

2001

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, and, Department of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

2000

From the Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Department of Hematology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (E.O.)

1999

Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (R.E.G., R.P.M); 2Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (E.D.I., E.P.O.); and 3Department of Microbiology, Kumamoto University of Medicine, Kumamoto, Japan (H.M.)

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

1998

From the Department of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC; and the Departments of Pharmacology and Medicine, and The Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

1997

General Clinical Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A

1996

Division of Hematology / Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

1995

Director, General Clinical Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Biopure Corporation Boston Mass.

University of North Carolina Department of Medicine Chapel Hill N.C.

Upjohn Company Kalamazoo Mich.

1993

Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599–7365.

1992

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

1991

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599.

1990

Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill

1988

Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Louisiana State University Medical Center, Shreveport, La.;, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, N.C., USA

1987

Department of Medicine and the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program, The School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1986

From the Department of Surgery and Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and The North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill.

The University of North Carolina Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, The School of Medicine Chapel Hill

1984

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, U.S.A.

1982

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

Departments of Pathology and Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire, INSERM UO48, Le Kremlin‐Bicetre, France 94270

1981

Division of Hematology, Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina, 27514, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

1980

Department of Hospital Laboratories, Hematology and Department of Internal Medicine, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

1979

Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1978

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 27514, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

1977

Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

1976

Division of Hematology, Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514, USA

Prominent publications by Eugene P Orringer

KOL-Index: 17034 . BACKGROUND: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a common complication in patients with sickle cell disease, and collapse of the femoral head occurs in 90% of patients within five years after the diagnosis of the osteonecrosis. However, the efficacy of hip core decompression to prevent the progression of osteonecrosis in these patients is still controversial. METHODS: In a prospective ...
Known for Physical Therapy | Core Decompression | Femoral Head | Sickle Cell Disease
KOL-Index: 16589 . BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is common in sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to determine whether markers of coagulation activation and inflammation are associated with PHT in SCD. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed using a cohort of patients followed at an adult Sickle Cell Clinic. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure was ...
Known for Coagulation Activation | Scd Patients | Pulmonary Hypertension | Sickle Cell
KOL-Index: 11798 . BACKGROUND: The acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death among patients with sickle cell disease. Since its cause is largely unknown, therapy is supportive. Pilot studies with improved diagnostic techniques suggest that infection and fat embolism are underdiagnosed in patients with the syndrome. METHODS: In a 30-center study, we analyzed 671 episodes of the acute chest syndrome ...
Known for Acute Chest Syndrome | Sickle Cell Disease | Fat Embolism | Respiratory Failure
KOL-Index: 11607 . Painful crises in patients with sickle cell anemia are caused by vaso-occlusion and infarction. Occlusion of blood vessels depends on (at least) their diameter, the deformability of red cells, and the adhesion of blood cells to endothelium. Deoxygenated sickle cells are rigid because they contain linear polymers of hemoglobin S (Hb S); polymerization is highly concentration dependent, and ...
Known for Cell Anemia | Fetal Hemoglobin Hb | Painful Crises | Patients Sickle
KOL-Index: 11038 . Renal failure occurs in 5-18% of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients and is associated with early mortality. At-risk SCD patients cannot be identified prior to the appearance of proteinuria and the pathobiology is not well understood. The myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) and apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) genes have been associated with risk for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and ...
Known for Sickle Cell | Apol1 Risk | Scd Patients | African Americans
KOL-Index: 10946 . The vasoocclusive crisis is the major clinical feature of sickle cell anemia, which is believed to be initiated or sustained by sickle (SS) red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to the vascular wall. SS RBCs, but not unaffected (AA) RBCs, adhere avidly to multiple components of the vascular wall, including laminin. Here we report a novel role for epinephrine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate ...
Known for Rbc Adhesion | Bcam Lu | Vascular Wall | Laminin Receptor
KOL-Index: 10669 . We recently reported that CD47 (integrin-associated protein) on sickle red blood cells (SS RBCs) activates G-protein-dependent signaling, which promotes cell adhesion to immobilized thrombospondin (TSP) under relevant shear stress. These data suggested that signal transduction in SS RBCs may contribute to the vaso-occlusive pathology observed in sickle cell disease. However, the ...
Known for Alpha4beta1 Integrin | Cell Adhesion | Signal Transduction | Plasma Fibronectin
KOL-Index: 10551 . CONTEXT: Sickle cell disease (SCD) can cause severe painful episodes that are often thought to be caused by vaso-occlusion. The current therapy for these uncomplicated painful episodes includes hydration, oxygen, and analgesics. Purified poloxamer 188 may increase tissue oxygenation and thereby reduce inflammation, pain, and the overall duration of such painful episodes in patients with ...
Known for Purified Poloxamer | Painful Episodes | Patients Scd | Randomized Controlled Trial
KOL-Index: 10471 . CONTEXT: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a chronic illness causing progressive deterioration in quality of life. Brain dysfunction may be the most important and least studied problem affecting individuals with this disease. OBJECTIVE: To measure neurocognitive dysfunction in neurologically asymptomatic adults with SCA vs healthy control individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: ...
Known for Patients Sca | Cell Anemia | Neuroimaging Abnormalities | Executive Function
KOL-Index: 10371 . Although pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a common complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the rate of development of PHT and the factors that affect disease progression are unknown. We observed 93 patients over a median follow-up period of 2.6 years (range 0.2-5.1 years). Data were censored at the time of death or loss to follow-up. Pulmonary hypertension was associated ...
Known for Pulmonary Hypertension | Patients Pht | Sickle Cell | Scd Adult Anemia
KOL-Index: 10303 . BACKGROUND: Nephropathy may develop in patients with sickle cell disease. We determined the prevalence of proteinuria and renal insufficiency in a group of patients with sickle cell disease and investigated the renal pathologic changes and the effects of an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (enalapril) on protein excretion in patients found to have nephropathy. METHODS: We ...
Known for Sickle Cell | Proteinuria Patients | Converting Enzyme | Renal Insufficiency
KOL-Index: 9953 . Sickle red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to the endothelium and to exposed, underlying subendothelial proteins is believed to contribute to vascular occlusion in sickle cell disease. Laminin, a major component of the subendothelium, supports significant adhesion of sickle, but not normal RBCs. The purpose of this study was to define the adhesive region for sickle RBCs within a human laminin ...
Known for Cell Adhesion | Alpha5 Chain | Sickle Rbcs | Monoclonal Antibody
KOL-Index: 9950 . The present study examined whether training in cognitive coping skills would enhance pain coping strategies and alter pain perception in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Sixty-four African Americans with SCD were randomly assigned to either a cognitive coping skills condition (three 45-min sessions in which patients were trained to use 6 cognitive coping strategies) or a ...
Known for Coping Strategies | Sickle Cell | Skills Training | Variance Anemia

Key People For Sickle Cell Disease

Top KOLs in the world
#1
Elliott P Vichinsky
sickle cell disease iron overload pulmonary hypertension
#2
Martin H Steinberg
sickle cell anemia fetal hemoglobin cell disease
#3
Samir K Ballas
sickle cell disease iron overload cell anemia
#4
Oswaldo L Castro
sickle cell disease pulmonary hypertension iron overload
#5
Russell E Ware
sickle cell anemia children sca hydroxyurea therapy
#6
Mark T Gladwin
sickle cell disease pulmonary hypertension nitric oxide

University of North Carolina Department of Medicine Division of Hematology & Oncology Chapel Hill North Carolina | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC | Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cha