Louis C Argenta: Influence Statistics

Louis C Argenta

Louis C Argenta

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, Wake-Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States | Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest ...


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Louis C Argenta: Expert Impact

Concepts for which Louis C Argenta has direct influence: Subatmospheric pressure , Mechanical tissue resuscitation , Tissue expansion , Amniotic fluid , Deformational plagiocephaly , Positional plagiocephaly , Proboscis lateralis .

Louis C Argenta: KOL impact

Concepts related to the work of other authors for which for which Louis C Argenta has influence: Negative pressure , Wound therapy , Tissue expansion , Deformational plagiocephaly , Breast reconstruction , Assisted closure , Skin graft .

KOL Resume for Louis C Argenta

Year
2017

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, Wake-Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States

2016

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Medical School, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

2015

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Wake Forest University Health Sciences Winston‐Salem North Carolina

2014

Wake Forest University School of Medicine Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research Winston‐Salem North Carolina

2013

Wake Forest School of Medicine Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Winston‐Salem North Carolina

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Winston Salem, NC, USA

2012

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Medical Center Blvd., Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA

2011

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine and Brenner Children’s Hospital, Winston‐Salem, NC, USA

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, Medical Center Blvd., Surgery Division, Wake‐Forest University School of Medicine, Winston‐Salem, North Carolina

2010

From the Departments of *Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and †Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; and ‡Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

Chief of Craniofacial Surgery, Director, Craniofacial Anomalies Program, Division of Plastic Surgery, Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine and Brenner Children’s Hospital, Winston‐Salem, NC, USA (email:

2009

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, North Carolina Center for Cleft and Craniofacial Deformities, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

2008

Winston-Salem, N.C. From the Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and General Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

2007

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

2006

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston‐Salem, North Carolina

2005

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

2004

North Carolina Institute for Cleft and Craniofacial Deformities, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1075, USA.

2003

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baptist Medical Center, Wake Forest University, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1075, USA

2002

From the Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (M.J.M., H.H., J.A.M., L.C.A.) and Internal Medicine, Section on Nephrology (A.J.B.), Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

North Carolina Center for Cleft and Craniofacial Deformities and the Departments of *Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, †Ophthalmology, and ‡Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Wake Forest University, Winston‐Salem, NC.

2001

Winston‐Salem, N. C.

2000

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston‐Salem, NC.

Oxford Regional Burns Unit, Aylesbury, UK, and Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC

1999

Winston-Salem, N.C. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Wake Forest University School of Medicine; Medical Center Boulevard; Winston-Salem, N.C. 27157-1075; largenta@wfubmc.edu (Argenta) From the Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and of Hearing and Speech, Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Winston‐Salem, N.C., and Dallas, Texas

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston‐Salem, North Carolina

1998

From the Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and †Neurosurgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC.

1997

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

1996

*Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Winston-Salem, North Carolina †Neurosurgery, and Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Grand Rapids, Mich., and Winston‐Salem, N.C.

1995

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

1993

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA

1992

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman-Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine Medical Center Blvd., 27157-1075, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

1991

Plastic Surgery Research Laboratory and the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University., Winston-Salem, N.C.

1990

Discussion by James W. May, Jr., M.D.

Ann Arbor, Mich. From the Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, at the University of Michigan Medical School.

Departments of Pathology, and of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C. USA

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Bowman Gray School of Medicine Wake Forest University 300 South Hawthorne Road Winston-Salem, N.C. 27103

1989

Ann Arbor, Mich. Malcolm W. Marks, M.D. Section on Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Bowman Gray School of Medicine Wake Forest University Medical Center 300 South Hawthorne Road Winston-Salem, N.C. 27103 From the Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical Center.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, 300 South Hawthorne Road, 27103, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA

1988

Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Michigan School of Medicine Ann Arbor, USA

1987

Associate Professor and Interim Head, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1986

Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

1985

Ann Arbor, Mich.

1984

Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI

The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Hershey, Pa. 17033 10152 Cynthia Drive Huntington Beach, Calif. 92646 University Hospital Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109

Prominent publications by Louis C Argenta

KOL-Index: 11385 . Fasciotomy wounds can be a major contributor to length of stay for patients as well as a difficult reconstructive challenge. Once the compartment pressure has been relieved and stabilized, the wound should be closed as quickly and early as possible to avoid later complications. Skin grafting can lead to morbidity and scarring at both the donor and fasciotomy site. Primary closure results ...
Known for Fasciotomy Wound | Primary Closure | Skin Grafting | Vac Device
KOL-Index: 8981 . Lower-extremity wounds with exposed tendon, bone, or orthopedic hardware present a difficult treatment challenge. In this series of patients, subatmospheric pressure therapy was applied to such lower-extremity wounds. Seventy-five patients with lower-extremity wounds, most of which were the result of trauma, were selected for this study. Dressings made of sterile open-cell foam with ...
Known for Closure Therapy | Extremity Wounds | Exposed Bone | Vacuum Wound
KOL-Index: 8865 . Deformational plagiocephaly, cranial asymmetry secondary to positioning, continues to be a leading cause of head shape abnormalities in infants. Treatment recommendations include nonintervention, positioning therapies, and helmet therapy. Although most agree that surgical intervention is rarely indicated, the ideal therapy is not agreed on. Some even debate the necessity of treatment, ...
Known for Helmet Therapy | Deformational Plagiocephaly | Outcome Analysis | Cranial Asymmetry
KOL-Index: 8367 . The use of subatmospheric pressure to promote wound healing has increased in popularity during the last several years. The original studies on granulation tissue formation used a 125-mmHg vacuum. The use of alternative sources of subatmospheric pressure has led to many questions regarding efficacy or risk. In this report a swine model is used to quantify and compare the effects of low ...
Known for Subatmospheric Pressure | Granulation Tissue | Experimental Wounds | Vacuum Wound
KOL-Index: 8367 . BACKGROUND: Spring-assisted surgery (SAS) has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of the first 75 cases compared with a prospectively collected group of patients treated with cranial expansion (cranial vault remodeling [CVR]). METHODS: Seventy-five children with scaphocephaly have completed this ...
Known for Infant Length | Sas Cvr | Springassisted Surgery | Outcome Analysis
KOL-Index: 8008 . Twenty-seven consecutive pediatric patients presenting to the orthopaedic surgery or plastic surgery services were reviewed after completion of wound care with the Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C.) system. Each patient presented with complex soft tissue wounds requiring coverage procedures. Patients with acute wounds and wounds present after nonsuccessful attempts at surgical closure ...
Known for Pediatric Patients | Soft Tissue | Wound Healing | Vac Device
KOL-Index: 7873 . BACKGROUND: Reconstruction of the abdominal wall poses a problem common to many surgical specialties. Abdominal wall defects may be caused by trauma and/or prior surgery, with dehiscence or infection. Several options to repair the structural integrity of the abdominal wall exist, including primary closure, flaps, mesh, and skin grafts. Complications of these procedures include recurrent ...
Known for Abdominal Wall | Assisted Closure | Skin Grafts | Surgical Procedures
KOL-Index: 7824 . BACKGROUND: Haemangiomas are common vascular lesions occurring in up to 10-12% of infants by 1 year of age. Typically, these lesions are treated expectantly unless complicated by haemorrhage, ulceration, infection, or compromise of adjacent vital structures. Ulceration is a particularly difficult problem because of associated pain, infection, haemorrhage, and subsequent scarring. MATERIALS ...
Known for Laser Therapy | Ulcerated Haemangiomas | Treatment Lesions | Hemangioma Humans
KOL-Index: 7519 . The aim in this study was to describe the safety and efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in patients with complex cranial wounds with extensive scalp, bone, and dural defects who were not candidates for immediate free tissue transfer. Five patients (4 men and 1 woman) ages 24-73 years with complex cranial wounds were treated with VAC at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Etiologies ...
Known for Vac Therapy | Complex Cranial Wounds | Dura Mater | Assisted Closure
KOL-Index: 7445 . The gold standard for closing small cranial defects is autogenous bone: iliac crest, rib, or split calvarial grafts. Autogenous grafts result in donor site morbidity, increased operative time, blood loss, and additional cost, and they are limited in quantity. Hydroxyapatite cements are alternative bone substitutes that eliminate these restrictions. Although the use of hydroxyapatite is ...
Known for Hydroxyapatite Cement | Pediatric Craniofacial | Autogenous Bone | Retrospective Review

Aplasia Cutis Congenita


[ PUBLICATION ]
KOL-Index: 6936 . BACKGROUND: Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence of skin and adjacent tissue that usually affects the scalp, but any part of the body may be affected. Although ACC is more often superficial and small, it can be large and involve the underlying structures such as skull and dura, thus increasing the risk of hemorrhage, infection, and mortality. ...
Known for Aplasia Cutis Congenita | Tissue Expansion | Infection Hemorrhage | Skin Grafting

Key People For Subatmospheric Pressure

Top KOLs in the world
#1
Louis C Argenta
subatmospheric pressure tissue expansion deformational plagiocephaly
#2
Michael J Morykwas
subatmospheric pressure mechanical tissue resuscitation amniotic fluid
#3
Wyman T McGuirt
hearing loss sensorineural humans missense mutation
#4
Erica I SheltonBrown
wound control subatmospheric pressure skin surgery
#5
Dennis Paul Orgill
wound healing plastic surgery external volume expansion
#6
Seiji Katayama
laser welding stainless steel molten pool

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, Wake-Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States | Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University Medical School, Winston-Salem, NC, USA | Departments of Plastic and